Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am familiar with AWS Java SDK, I also tried to browse the corresponding Javadoc, but I could not realize how do I create a sub directory, i.e., a directory object within a bucket, and how do I upload files to it.

Assume bucketName and dirName correspond to already existing bucket (with public permission) and a new (object) directory which needs to be created within the bucket (i.e. bucketName/dirName/)

I have tried the following:

AmazonS3Client s3 = new AmazonS3Client(
    new BasicAWSCredentials(ACCESS_KEY, SECRET_KEY));
s3.createBucket(bucketName + "/" + dirName); //throws exception

which throws an exception on the second line.

A short snippet which creates a sub-directory and uploads files to it will be deeply appreciated.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

There are no "sub-directories" in S3. There are buckets and there are keys within buckets.

You can emulate traditional directories by using prefix searches. For example, you can store the following keys in a bucket:

foo/bar1
foo/bar2
foo/bar3
blah/baz1
blah/baz2

and then do a prefix search for foo/ and you will get back:

foo/bar1
foo/bar2
foo/bar3

See AmazonS3.listObjects for more details.


Update: Assuming you already have an existing bucket, the key under that bucket would contain the /:

s3.putObject("someBucket", "foo/bar1", file1);
s3.putObject("someBucket", "foo/bar2", file2);
...

Then you can list all keys starting with foo/:

ObjectListing listing = s3.listObjects("someBucket", "foo/");
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply, could please provide a short snippet code? Since as you see in my post, I have tried to create something like foo/bar but it throws an exception. –  MrRoth Jul 15 '12 at 11:37
    
@MrRoth: See my update. –  casablanca Jul 15 '12 at 12:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.