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I am trying to implement something similar to the python with statement in C++. As I plan to use it mainly with Qt-OpenGL the methods are called bind and release (in python __enter__, __exit__).

Code I came up with:

header:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

class With
{
public:
    class A
    {
    public:
        virtual ~A() { }
    };

    template <typename T>
    class B : public A
    {
    public:
        B(T& _t) : t(_t)
        {
            t.bind();
        }

        virtual ~B()
        {
            t.release();
        }

        T& t;
    };

    template <typename... Args>
    With(Args&... args)
    {
        set(args...);
    }

    ~With();

    template <typename T, typename... Args>
    void set(T& t, Args&... args)
    {
        set(t);
        set(args...);
    }

    template <typename T>
    void set(T& t)
    {
        a.push_back(dynamic_cast<A*>(new B<T>(t)));
    }

    std::vector<A*> a;
};

cpp:

With::~With()
{
    for (auto it = a.begin(); it != a.end(); ++it)
    {
        delete *it;
    }
}

Usage:

class X
{
public:
    void bind() { std::cout << "bind x" << std::endl; }
    void release() { std::cout << "release x" << std::endl; }
};

class Y
{
public:
    void bind() { std::cout << "bind y" << std::endl; }
    void release() { std::cout << "release y" << std::endl; }
};

int main()
{
    X y;
    Y y;

    std::cout << "start" << std::endl;
    {
        With w(x, y);
        std::cout << "with" << std::endl;
    }

    std::cout << "done" << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Questions:

  1. Needing class A and class B feels a bit clumsy. Is there a better alternative?
  2. Are there any draw backs in using && instead of &? It would make the usage of tempory objects possible (e.g. With w(X(), y);)
share|improve this question
2  
Google for ScopeGuard (ignore the code project link an look for the drdobbs article) alternatively use shared_ptr with a custom deleter.... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 15 '12 at 13:19
    
@tauran: What's the advantage over automatically called destructors? –  doublep Jul 15 '12 at 16:42
6  
Don’t take this the wrong way, since you clearly know your C++ (as evidenced from the (technically) correct use of virtual functions, templates and type packs) but this belongs on the DailyWTF: you are trying, with considerable effort and complexity, to emulate a feature from another language which itself is an inferior emulation of a feature that C++ has natively. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 15 '12 at 17:11
1  
@David: I'd rather recommend unique_ptr over shared_ptr, though. –  Xeo Jul 15 '12 at 17:16
    
@Konrad: I'd state more accurately that he clearly knows of them, but not much about them. –  DeadMG Jul 15 '12 at 17:17
show 12 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The with statement is a way to do in python what is already the normal thing in C++. It is called RAII: Resource acquisition is initialization.

In python, when a class object is created, the __init__ method is called (but this is not a strict guarantee). The __del__ method is called by the garbage collector at some point after the object is no longer in use, but it is not deterministic.

In C++ the destructor is called at a well defined point so there is no need for with.

I suggest you just use something like class B (no need for class A or With).

template <typename T>
class B {
public:
    B(T& _t) : t(_t){
        t.bind();
    }
    ~B() {
        t.release();
    }
    T& t;
}

use it like this:

{
    B<X> bound_x(x);  // x.bind is called
    B<Y> bound_y(y);  // y.bind is called
    // use x and y here
} // bound_x and bound_y is destroyed here 
  // so x.release and y.release is called    
share|improve this answer
    
I know that. I used RAII too -> Class B. I just wanted to wrap it in one statement (without macros). But from the responses here I think the average dev prefers your solution and therefore it's better than mine :) –  tauran Jul 15 '12 at 18:39
1  
Right, I guessed that you knew but I wanted to make the answer complete. –  Johan Lundberg Jul 15 '12 at 18:52
add comment

It ships with the language, and it's called RAII.

struct X {
    X() { std::cout << "bind\n"; }
    ~X() { std::cout << "release\n"; }
};
int main() {
    X x;
}
share|improve this answer
    
how is different from what I wrote? –  Johan Lundberg Jul 15 '12 at 17:19
3  
Your code introduces a thoroughly pointless additional class. –  DeadMG Jul 15 '12 at 17:21
    
well, he needs help calling .bind() and .release() which presumably exist in the Qt-OpenGL classes he is using. And your answer does not do that. At least that's how I interpreted the question. Seems like bad design, I agree, but that seems to be out of his control. –  Johan Lundberg Jul 15 '12 at 17:22
1  
Hmm. Possibly I misread the question- he was not very specific about what the problem was. –  DeadMG Jul 15 '12 at 17:26
3  
@DeadMG: your code does not introduce a class, but assumes that the type on which bind and release are to be called can be modified to add the logic which might not be the case. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 15 '12 at 17:29
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