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A friend of mine (who is much more skilled with javascript than I am) was helping me optimise some code recently, and one of the things that he mentioned might help was to call an external function instead of using a scoped function. However, it appears that this actually doesn't appear to have much if any impact on performance. Would anyone who is more familiar with the inner workings of javascript mind explaining why this is the case? Is there any any reason to use one method over another?

What I mean is, this:

function showI(e) {
    var iVal = $(e).attr('iteration');
    var iValx99 = iVal * 99;
    var iValx999 = iVal * 999;
    alert(iVal + ' // ' + iValx99 + ' // ' + iValx999);
}
var element;
for (var i = 0; i < 50; i++) {
    element = $('<div />', {
        'class': 'iteration',
        'iteration': i
    });
    element.on('click', function() {
        showI(element);
    });
    element.appendTo('body');
}

versus:

var element;
for (var i = 0; i < 50; i++) {
    (function() {
        var j = i;
        element = $('<div />', {
            'class': 'iteration'
        });
        element.on('click', function() {
            var iVal = j;
            var iValx99 = iVal * 99;
            var iValx999 = iVal * 999;
            alert(iVal + ' // ' + iValx99 + ' // ' + iValx999);
        });
        element.appendTo('body');
    })();
}

jsperf benchmark example:

http://jsperf.com/function-click-on-every-element-vs-calling-a-function/2

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, you are throwing away the performance gains from using a static function by defining a new function everytime anyway.

What he probably meant was to use this:

element.on('click', showI ); //Just passing an already created function is cheaper than creating a new function object everytime

You don't even need to bind it 50 times:

$("body").on("click", ".iteration", showI );

And modify showI:

function showI(e) {
    var iVal = $(this).attr('iteration');
    var iValx99 = iVal * 99;
    var iValx999 = iVal * 999;
    alert(iVal + ' // ' + iValx99 + ' // ' + iValx999);
}

This is much faster in the modifed jsperf http://jsperf.com/function-click-on-every-element-vs-calling-a-function/3

jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/RgU5z/

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+1.. very interesting. I'll start to change the way I define and call functions –  Adi Jul 15 '12 at 11:51
    
thanks.. going to try this versus the method suggested by Kooilnc after I'm finished eating, interesting stuff! :) –  Evan Jul 15 '12 at 11:57
    
in your jsperf example, don't you need to declare // $("body").on("click", ".iteration", showI); // after the elements have been appended to the body, or am I wrong on this? –  Evan Jul 15 '12 at 12:07
1  
@Evan it binds the event on "body", not on the elements. So only "body" needs to exist –  Esailija Jul 15 '12 at 12:08
    
Thanks - I think it's clear this is the best way of doing things.. also thanks to KooiInc for the link regarding javascript functions! –  Evan Jul 15 '12 at 12:55

If you declare the function outside the loop, you only have to declare it once. Theoretically that would be more effecient. But within the loop now you declare an anonymous function within each iteration. That is not necessary, you can use a reference to the function: element.on('click', showI) and reference the element within showI as this (or $(this), so var iVal = $(this).attr('iteration');).

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1  
Also, all the DOM stuff in these tests are so expensive that creating a new object vs referencing previous one is not gonna show up in the results at all –  Esailija Jul 15 '12 at 12:04

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