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Stack^ my_stack=gcnew Stack;
my_class^ a=gcnew my_class;
my_stack->Push(a);
my_stack->Push(gcnew my_class);
my_stack->Pop(); //will it cause memory leak?
a=gcnew my_class;
my_stack->Pop(); //will it cause memory leak?

sorry that the code is not tested. But I guess you all get what I mean here. when you pop a pointer, you lose the pointer; will the memory be released? there is also a method my_stack->Clear() which is also confusing for me.

Any help would be appreciated.

edit:

@Konrad Rudolph

Would the Pop() method call the destructor itself or the clr will automatically retrieve the memory space?

Konrad Rudolph also suggests me to consider using generic collection classes only.

For the new System::Collections::Generic::Stack<T> It says 'Removes and returns the object at the top of the Stack' And if so, what if I have another pointer pointed to object before? that is,

my_class^ a=gcnew my_class;
Stack<my_class>^ my_stack=gcnew Stack<my_class>;
my_stack->Push(a);
my_stack->Pop(); //what is a now? nullptr?
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Why do you even put raw pointers in your container in the first place? –  Kerrek SB Jul 15 '12 at 13:20
    
it works that way...check here link –  Immueggpain Jul 15 '12 at 13:21
    
@KerrekSB What raw pointers? –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 15 '12 at 13:27
    
@Immueggpain Whatever else, consider using generic collection classes only. The non-generic ones (from System::Collections) are, for all intents and purposes, deprecated and should not be used. Use System::Collections::Generic::Stack<T> instead. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 15 '12 at 13:28
    
@Konrad Rudolph thanks for your help. And what's the difference between generic collection classes and non-generic collection classes? I also see here link. It says 'Removes and returns the object at the top of the Stack<T>'. If so, what if I have another pointer pointed to object before? Does the pointer become a nullptr? –  Immueggpain Jul 15 '12 at 13:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Pop does not call the destructor. You can use something like

T *topObject = my_stack->top();
my_stack->pop();
delete topObject;
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it's managed c++ and you seem to use native codes... –  Immueggpain Jul 15 '12 at 13:47
    
oh yes my answer is for native code...no managed code exp. –  msk Jul 15 '12 at 13:48

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