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I currently have a table that has the majority (like 99%) of the data of a field dependent on a single field but the other 1% is dependent on other fields.

For example, I have the following price table

product PK
color PK
cost

The following are some entries in that table

product|color|cost
pen|red|$1.00
pen|blue|$1.00
pen|green|$1.00
etc....
pen|black|$0.90
pen|white|$0.85
pencil|red|$0.50
pencil|blue|$0.50
pencil|green|$0.50
etc...
pencil|black|$0.35
pencil|gray|$0.40

The problem I'm having with this table is that whenever I have to add a single product or color I have to add hundreds of similar entries to this table.

I'm currently thinking of storing the data in the following way

pen|all_other_colors|$1.00
pen|black|$0.90
pen|white|$0.85
pencil|all_other_colors|$0.50
pencil|black|$0.35
pencil|gray|$0.40

Am I on the right track or is there a better database design that handles this problem? Any help or links would be appreciated. I can't get the right wording to google for this problem.

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could you summarize your problem? Is it that you do not want to manage each price separately, or ? Even without prices, you would need to manage which product-combinations are available –  Damir Sudarevic Jul 15 '12 at 16:30
    
In my design, I have the assumption that a product can have any color in the colors table. I was hoping to reduce the need to insert hundreds of product-color combination entries everytime I add a new product (which occurs frequently) and deal only with the exceptions in the pricing for product-color combination (which is rare.) Your answer is kind of what I was looking for. I'm probably going with an "exception" table, though I'm not sure if that violates any database design theory. Thanks for the help! –  oli ten Jul 15 '12 at 20:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
  • BaseProduct has all product names and their prices
  • Product has all available valid product-color combinations
  • ColorPrice is the difference (offset) from the base price.
  • ColorCharge has only rows with exception pricing (no rows for ColorPrice = 0)

enter image description here

To get info for a specific base product (specific_prodict_id)

select
      b.ProductName
    , c.ColorName
    , b.ProductPrice + coalesce(x.ColorPrice, 0.0) as ProductPrice
from      Product     as p
join      BaseProduct as b on b.BaseProductID = p.BaseProductID
join      Color       as c on c.ColorId       = p.ColorId
left join ColorCharge as x on x.BaseProductID = p.BaseProductID and x.ColorID = p.ColorID
where p.BaseProductID = specific_prodict_id;
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You need to normalize database tables

break it in three tables as below:

Products

id | product

colors

id | color

product_cost

id |  Product_id | color_id | Cost
share|improve this answer
    
I do have a products table and a color table but I still have the same problem. Adding an entry to the products table forces me to create hundreds of similar entries to the product_cost table. –  oli ten Jul 15 '12 at 13:43
    
they will not be similar use unique primary key for each product - color- cost combination –  Lucifer Jul 15 '12 at 13:47
    
If I add a product like a marker to the products table, and for the hundreds of colors in the color table the price for the markers are the same except for the markers with the colors black and red, the correct way to do it is by adding hundreds of entries to the product_cost table? –  oli ten Jul 15 '12 at 13:59

You could group colors together and then insert the price for the whole group:

enter image description here

And your example could be represented similarly to this...

PRICE:

    PRODUCT_ID  GROUP_ID    PRICE
    pen         1           $1.00
    pen         2           $0.90
    pen         3           $0.85    
    pencil      1           $0.50
    pencil      2           $0.35
    pencil      4           $0.40

GROUP:

    GROUP_ID
    1
    2
    3
    4

COLOR_GROUP:

    GROUP_ID    COLOR_ID
    1           red
    1           blue
    1           green
    2           black
    3           white
    4           gray

COLOR:

    COLOR_ID
    red
    blue
    green
    black
    white
    gray

Whether the increased complexity is worth it is up to you...

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