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An example:

template <typename TDerived>
struct Base
{
    void DoSomething()
    {
        if (static_cast<TDerived*>(this)->CheckSomeFlag())
        {
            std::cout << "true" << std::endl;
        }
        else
        {
            std::cout << "false" << std::endl;
        }
    }

    // Default implementation
    bool CheckSomeFlag()
    {
        return false;
    }
};

struct Derived : public Base<Derived>
{
    bool CheckSomeflag()
    {
        return true;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    Derived d;

    d.DoSomething();
    return 0;
}

In this case the program prints "false" because the programmer had a typo in the declaration of Derived::CheckSomeFlag() and the F is lowercase. I would like to catch situations like this at compile time using a macro like OVERRIDE(x) which expands to a static_assert(is_member_of<Base, x>::value, "error"); but am unsure of the template trickery needed to accomplish this.

share|improve this question
    
You cannot, never ever, override a non-virtual member function. –  Kerrek SB Jul 15 '12 at 15:10
    
I was not sure what the correct description is, maybe 'hide' is more appropriate in this situation? –  Deckard Cain Jul 15 '12 at 15:13
    
Maybe "declare a function of the same name and signature"? Anyway, if you require that the function be redeclared in the derived class, why provide a default at all? –  Kerrek SB Jul 15 '12 at 15:14
    
Sometimes I want default behavior and other times I want to change the default behavior, and when I do I want to make sure that I am actually declaring a function of the same name/signature. This is kinda similar to the 'override' specifier in C++11 for virtual functions that checks that you are actually overriding something. –  Deckard Cain Jul 15 '12 at 15:17
    
So you want some sort of diagnostic code to go into the derived class definition in those cases where you do want to provide an override? (What if you misspell the diagnostic code?) –  Kerrek SB Jul 15 '12 at 15:18

4 Answers 4

A mix of templates and macros can provide the ability to:

  • Statically assert if a similar function is not declared on the base class.
  • Declare the function within the derived class.

With this approach, a macro will define a type trait template that tests for the existence of a specific member function on the base class. When the base class has the specified member function, the trait's value member will be true. The value of the type trait is then used within a static assert.

#define TRAITNAME_HELPER( PREFIX, FN, LN )  PREFIX ## FN ## LN
#define TRAITNAME( FN, LN ) TRAITNAME_HELPER( has_fn, FN, LN )

#define OVERRIDE_IMPL( CLASS, RETURN_TYPE, FN, ARG_TYPES, LN )  \
  /* Type trait used to determine if                            \
   * RETURN_TYPE T::FN( ARG_TYPES ) exists. */                  \
  template < typename T >                                       \
  struct TRAITNAME( FN, LN )                                    \
  {                                                             \
    /* Type that expects a value for the specific type.  For    \
     * example, type_check< int, 4 >. */                        \
    template < typename U, U > struct type_check {};            \
                                                                \
    /* Use type_check expect a specific                         \
     * pointer-to-member-function on T. */                      \
    template < typename U >                                     \
    static std::true_type                                       \
    check( type_check< RETURN_TYPE (T::*)ARG_TYPES,             \
                       &U::FN >* = 0 );                         \
                                                                \
    template < typename U >                                     \
    static std::false_type check( ... );                        \
                                                                \
    /* Determine which check function was resolved for T. */    \
    typedef decltype( check< T >( 0 ) ) type;                   \
    static constexpr decltype(type::value) value = type::value; \
  };                                                            \
  static_assert( TRAITNAME( FN, LN )< CLASS >::value,           \
                 "" #RETURN_TYPE " " #FN #ARG_TYPES             \
                 " is not defined in " #CLASS "." );            \
  RETURN_TYPE FN ARG_TYPES
#define OVERRIDE( CLASS, RETURN_TYPE, FN, ARG_TYPES )           \
  OVERRIDE_IMPL( CLASS, RETURN_TYPE, FN, ARG_TYPES, __LINE__ )
  • The lack of a semi-colon at the end of the OVERRIDE_IMPL macro allows for member function to be declared or defined within the class.
  • The additional level of macros is required to support overloaded methods. It is using __LINE__ to create a unique type trait.

With the following Base class:

template < typename TDerived >
struct Base
{
  bool CheckSomeFlag();
  bool CheckSomeFlag(int, int);
};

If Dervied class is defined as:

struct Derived : public Base< Derived >
{
  OVERRIDE( Base< Derived >, bool, CheckSomeflag, () );
};

Then the compile fails with the following error (demo):

error: static assertion failed: "bool CheckSomeflag() is not defined in Base< Derived >."

However, when the types are correct, it will compile, as demonstrated here:

struct Derived : public Base< Derived >
{
  OVERRIDE( Base< Derived >, bool, CheckSomeFlag, () );
  OVERRIDE( Base< Derived >, bool, CheckSomeFlag, (int a, int b) )
  {
    return ( a > b );
  }
};
bool Derived::CheckSomeFlag() { return true; }

There are two drawbacks that quickly come to mind with this approach:

  • The return types must be an exact match. Without some extra work, this prevents covariant return types from being used. However, this may be the desired behavior with the CRTP pattern.
  • The macro syntax obscures the function type. For example, instead of being able to use bool(int,int) as the type for a function returning a bool and having two int arguments, it has to be passed as two seperate arguments to the macro ( ..., bool, ..., (int, int) ). This can be mitigated by changing the order of arguments the macro expects, but I choose the order to match the normal declaration of a function: return-type identifier(args).
share|improve this answer

This seems to give you a compile time error:

...
template <bool (TDerived::*TPointer)()> class Checker { };

void DoSomething()
{
    static Checker<&TDerived::CheckSomeFlag> foo;
...

The idea being (I'm not a template expert, unfortunately) that I'm just trying to access the CheckSomeFlag member in TDerived, and the compiler won't be able to replace that with a pointer to the Base member since inheritance only works the other way (or maybe not at all, I'm never quite sure about non-virtual methods)

share|improve this answer

Here's an idea in C++11:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

struct Foo { void f() { } };
struct Bar : Foo { void f() { } };
struct Zip : Foo {              };

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Bar: " << std::is_same<decltype(&Bar::f), void(Foo::*)()>::value << std::endl
              << "Zip: " << std::is_same<decltype(&Zip::f), void(Foo::*)()>::value << std::endl
    ;
}

That could possibly be turned into a static assert.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this approach (I came to it myself at some point) is that it's not generic enough; you need to pass the signature of the function you are checking to is_same, in this case void(Foo::*)(), so you would not be able to make a generic static_assert macro that would work for any function signature. –  Deckard Cain Jul 15 '12 at 16:16
    
Also; this will not handle cases where Base has void func(int) and child accidentally declares void func(), not sure if that is required but still.. the "not be able to make a generic static_assert macro" is not really an issue though. –  Filip Roséen - refp Jul 15 '12 at 16:41
    
In the case a missing argument like that it would not compile which is the desired result. Base will be trying to call static_cast<TDerived*>(this)->func(5) and TDerived's func takes no parameters so you get a compilation error. And about the macro, my ultimate goal is to have something that I can use on every function that I declare that also exists in the base without being too verbose because then nobody would bother to use it. Something like OVERRIDE(Base, Func)(int x); which would simultaneously declare and check Func. –  Deckard Cain Jul 15 '12 at 16:49

You cannot do this from code. I suggest looking at some static analysis tools that you can employ to catch common (and not so common) programmer errors. There are lots of them. One example: http://www.coverity.com/products/static-analysis.html

This is a common programmer error and a base class author should be aware of this. Note that if you want to provide a default implementation but would like to force derived class programmer to override the method in order to avoid mistakes, you can employ the following trick using pure virtual declaration:

class Base {
  public:
  virtual void foo() = 0;
};
// Did you know that you can still implement pure virtual functions? Neat!
void Base::foo() {
  // does something useful that might be applicable to most cases
}
class Derived : public Base {
  typedef Base superclass;
  public:
  void foo() {
    // I am forced to override foo
    // But author of Base kindly provided a default implementation
    superclass::foo();
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
the above use of virtual might "solve" one part of the problem, but it will also change the whole inheritance scheme (introducing vtables, etc etc) –  Filip Roséen - refp Jul 15 '12 at 15:22
    
Indeed, this has to be done without virtual functions while keeping the CRTP scheme. –  Deckard Cain Jul 15 '12 at 15:40
    
And actually, once you go virtual you can just wait for your compiler to support the "override" keyword (g++, clang++ and Visual C++ already do) -- it will do that check for you. However, "override" won't work with non-virtual methods. –  Christian Stieber Jul 15 '12 at 17:18
    
Static analysis tools would likely provide the best overall results. However, this type of check is possible in code via templates, and becomes a little easier to use with the help of some macros. –  Tanner Sansbury Jul 24 '12 at 15:06

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