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function SlideShow(area) {
    var SlideImg = new Array('img1', 'img2');
    var SlideArea = document.getElementById(area);
    for (i = 0; i < SlideImg.length; i++) {
        if (SlideImg[i] == SlideImg[0]) {
            var classname = 'active';
        } else {
            var classname = 'not-active';
        }
        var html = '<img src="images/room/' + SlideImg[i] + '.jpg" id="' + SlideImg[i] + '" class="' + classname + '" />';
        SlideArea.innerHTML += html;
    }
    var a = 1;

    function RunSlide() {
        var before = a - 1;
        if (a > SlideImg.length - 1) {
            a = 0;
        }
        ImgBefore = document.getElementById(SlideImg[before]);
        ImgBefore.className = 'not-active';
        ImgNext = document.getElementById(SlideImg[a]);
        ImgNext.className = 'active';
        a++;
    }
    var run = setInterval(RunSlide, 5000);
}

How to change the a value? Because the a variable is not in the Global scope, can I access it from another function? I want to access it, but don't want to declare the a variable as a global.

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, but I really don't understand the question. Is it not just a case of declaring a outside of SlideShow? –  freefaller Jul 15 '12 at 15:46
    
Because the a variable is not in the Global scope, can I access it from another function? –  Ega Rana Jul 15 '12 at 15:50
    
Correct, by declaring it within SlideShow, only that function (and RunSlide) can access it. Declare it outside of the function, and it will be accessible globally –  freefaller Jul 15 '12 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

Yes, the variable is local to the function, so you have to expose a function outside to be able to access it.

You can for example put this last in the function to make it return a function that can set the variable:

function SlideShow(area) {
  ...
  return function(value){ a = value; };
}

Usage:

var setA = SlideShow(something);

Then later you can use the function:

setA(42);
share|improve this answer
    
Can you edit my code with your code? I think it's interesting one –  Ega Rana Jul 15 '12 at 16:09
    
@EgaRana: I'm sitting by a pad, so I don't have great editing capabilities, but I made the example a bit clearer. –  Guffa Jul 15 '12 at 16:17
    
This is fascinating, although it does require having a global variable to hold the returned function reference –  freefaller Jul 15 '12 at 16:19
    
@Guffa thanks a lot, it's helped. –  Ega Rana Jul 15 '12 at 16:31
    
@freefaller you have same opinion with me hehe –  Ega Rana Jul 15 '12 at 16:32

Simple, declare var a; outside of SlideShow and then it will be globally accessible.

Remember that it will still require resetting within the functin with a = 1;

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If you can make the scope of the a variable global, then you should be able to. Instead of declaring in your function, just reference variable and declare in the "< head >" of your page instead. See my example and this I tested and clicking diff links changes value of variable and displays on page.

<html>
<head><title>Test</title>
<script language="javascript">
var a = -1;

function changeVar(value) {
  a = value;
  document.getElementById("test1").innerHTML = a;
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Test page</h1>
<a href="#" onclick="changeVar(2);">Click me (2)</a> <br />
<a href="#" onclick="changeVar(5);">Click me (5)</a> <br />
<a href="#" onclick="changeVar(9);">Click me (9)</a> <br />
<hr>
<h1>Value for a is: <div id="test1"></div></h1>

<!-- really test by including function later on page -->
<script language="javascript">
function SlideShow(area) {
    var SlideImg = new Array('img1', 'img2');
    var SlideArea = document.getElementById(area);
    for (i = 0; i < SlideImg.length; i++) {
        if (SlideImg[i] == SlideImg[0]) {
            var classname = 'active';
        } else {
            var classname = 'not-active';
        }
        var html = '<img src="images/room/' + SlideImg[i] + '.jpg" id="' + SlideImg[i] + '" class="' + classname + '" />';
        SlideArea.innerHTML += html;
    }
    a = 1;  // removed declaration of a and just using a from prior declaration

    function RunSlide() {
        var before = a - 1;
        if (a > SlideImg.length - 1) {
            a = 0;
        }
        ImgBefore = document.getElementById(SlideImg[before]);
        ImgBefore.className = 'not-active';
        ImgNext = document.getElementById(SlideImg[a]);
        ImgNext.className = 'active';
        a++;
    }
    var run = setInterval(RunSlide, 5000);
}
</script>
</html>

You cannot access the variable itself if declared in the function because it's scope is LOCAL. See: http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_variables.asp

However, there is a way you could tweak your function to set a value of another element on the page, then others can reference that value. Using same code snippet for your script, when a is updated you can set the value of a hidden field on your page, and then others can reference that value. Any other way I think you have to declare it outside the function.

ALTERNATE 1:

<!-- really test by including function later on page -->
<script language="javascript">
function SlideShow(area) {
    var SlideImg = new Array('img1', 'img2');
    var SlideArea = document.getElementById(area);
    for (i = 0; i < SlideImg.length; i++) {
        if (SlideImg[i] == SlideImg[0]) {
            var classname = 'active';
        } else {
            var classname = 'not-active';
        }
        var html = '<img src="images/room/' + SlideImg[i] + '.jpg" id="' + SlideImg[i] + '" class="' + classname + '" />';
        SlideArea.innerHTML += html;
    }
    var a = 1;

    function RunSlide() {
        var before = a - 1;
        if (a > SlideImg.length - 1) {
            a = 0;
        }
        ImgBefore = document.getElementById(SlideImg[before]);
        ImgBefore.className = 'not-active';
        ImgNext = document.getElementById(SlideImg[a]);
        ImgNext.className = 'active';
        a++;
        // set value of element on page so others can reference
        document.getElementById("test1").innerHTML = a;  // or set a hidden field
    }
    var run = setInterval(RunSlide, 5000);
}
</script>

The other way you might be able to do it is declare a return for your function with the value of a, and callers can ignore it if they want and others can retrieve it. This may not work with your setTimeOut re-calling the RunSlide function. I tried another inner function within SlideShow but that didn't seem to return a either. Original scoping suggestion remains.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks four your code Mike, I appreciate it. I was try this code before for my SlideShow program before I change it to that code above. But can I access the variable without declare the a variable to global scope? –  Ega Rana Jul 15 '12 at 16:06
    
Added some more examples and link about scope above. Answer is "no" you cannot access the variable if not global, but there are workarounds as noted above. –  Mike S. Jul 15 '12 at 16:45

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