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While using OpenMP threads,

  1. Each thread can declare its own set of private variables. Is it correct to assume, that fetching data, which are private to each thread, has lower latency than fetching data visible to all threads. In other words, are the thread local variables cached ?

  2. Say each thread, wants to use a thread private STL data container like std::vector. In single threaded C++ code, data in the std::vector is stored on the heap. What about the multi-threaded case ? Are the data of the thread-private std::vectors still stored on the heap ?

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2 Answers 2

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Unless you're using a NUMA machine, memory is uniform.

Is it correct to assume, that fetching data, which are private to each thread, has lower latency than fetching data visible to all threads.

Thread-local storage isn't inherently "faster" than memory that is visible to all threads. However, memory that is only used by one thread is less likely to suffer from cache coherency effects - since it is only accessed by a single thread.

In other words, are the thread local variables cached?

Not necessarily. And it definitely won't be the case if it doesn't fit in the CPU cache. It is also possible for shared data to be in the caches of multiple cores at the same time.

What about the multi-threaded case ? Are the data of the thread-private std::vectors still stored on the heap ?

Yes, they will be in the heap regardless of the number of threads.

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Re your first sentence, is this actually true? It is somewhat contradicted by your second paragraph, which also echos my understanding. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 15 '12 at 16:11
    
Yes, I've done a project where I manually allocated data into different NUMA nodes and bound the associated threads to those nodes. (hence the "micro-managing" part) –  Mysticial Jul 15 '12 at 16:12
    
I meant the “memory is more or less uniform” part, not the “unless” part. That NUMA allows you to have non-uniform access is uncontested. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 15 '12 at 16:13
    
I'll get rid of the "more of less" part. I was being overly pedantic. There are cases in a non-NUMA machine where this can happen. (Caches for example can do weird things, but I won't get into that.) –  Mysticial Jul 15 '12 at 16:15

Private and shared variables are implemented differently in virtually all widely used OpenMP runtimes.

private automatic variables reside on the stack of each executing thread and threadprivate variables reside in the TLS. Automatic private variables can also be optimised to register ones as usual.

shared variables of a parallel region are usually implemented as a structure that is passed by address as an argument to each thread function and then additional pointer dereference is used to access each shared variable. Besides some compilers treat shared variables as implicitly volatile and issue the full spectrum of load/update/store instructions although OpenMP provides a relaxed memory model that allows for some degree of inconsistency between the visible values of the shared variables in the different threads up to certain synchronisation points, one such point being the explicit flush directive (still flush is the most widely misunderstood OpenMP feature and even the language makers cannot get their examples on its usage right in the standard document).

As for allocating data on the heap in the multithreaded case, heap operations are inherently serialised as most heap implementations use linked lists or similar data structures. Besides usual allocators don't care if data allocated by different threads might end up sharing a cache line and if this might lead to false sharing and the associated performance penalty. There are specialised multithreaded allocators like hoard, ptmalloc, umem, tcmalloc, etc. that try to tackle those problems at the expense of more memory used. Some of them (e.g. tcmalloc) are also NUMA-aware. tcmalloc docs claim that it does some sort of "magic" to make STL containers use its allocator instead of the default one but I cannot concur as I'm not a heavy user of both tcmalloc and C++.

One thing to consider when running on NUMA systems is thread binding. Some OpenMP runtimes already include provisions to control binding of threads to cores and forthcoming OpenMP standards will most likely include standard framework for specifying binding properties as it is now being discussed in the language committee.

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