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I'm quite a beginner with version control so I might be doing something very wrong.

I want to be able to access a local repository both in cygwin and in TortoiseSVN (or other Windows app). The trouble is, in cygwin I have to use the
file:///cygdrive/c/... paths while TortoiseSVN needs
file:///c:/....

How can I make these two work together? Can I use some other path/protocol that both understand?

Thanks!

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1  
Why is it a problem? – malenkiy_scot Jul 15 '12 at 16:23
1  
@malenkiy_scot, the problem is, when I've created the repository in shell and then try to run tortoiseSVN repo browser on the folder, it throws an error Unable to connect to a repository at URL 'file:///cygdrive/c/.... – Czechnology Jul 15 '12 at 16:26
    
Simply the path information in .svn folders is false for the windows system. – Czechnology Jul 15 '12 at 16:33
    
Well, the more I try to search the web the more it seems it's not possible to mix these two as even the svn processor is different (unix vs win)... – Czechnology Jul 15 '12 at 16:45
1  
@bahrep, because it's often useful to run commands from command line instead of GUI app like tortoiseSVN. And I use usually use cygwin because standard windows command line sucks. But currently I "fixed" it by using windows cmd. – Czechnology Jul 16 '12 at 10:17
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Easy way is to use the svnserve program that comes with Subversion. This should be in Cygwin. All you need to do is start up the svnserve and use svn:// as the protocol instead of file://.

First, you need to modify your repository. You'll have to edit two files: svnserve.conf and passed.

$ cd /cygdrive/c/.../repos_dir
$ cd conf
$ vi svnsever.conf   # Change the "# password-db = passwd" line & remove the "#"
$ vi passwd          # Setup the user and password entry

Next, you start the server:

$ cd ..    # Back to the repository directory
$ svnserve -r $PWD -d

And, that's it.

Now, you can do your checkout this way:

$ svn co svn://localhost/dir/to/check/out

This will be the same URL in both cygwin and in Tortoise


WORD 'O WARNING

There is no guarantee that different subversion clients will produce working directories that will work with other subversion clients.

Fortunately, Tortoise and the standard Subversion command line client seem to be okay. I've been able for the last few years to switch between the Subversion command line client and ToroiseSVN. HOWEVER, you do have to make sure that they're both ether post version 1.7 clients or pre 1.7 clients. If your Cygwin client is version 1.6.7 and your Tortoise client is 1.7.5, you can't share the working directory. Use the svn version command to check your Cygwin client, and check the About Box on Tortoise.

Again, there's no guarantee that both clients can share the same working directory, so if there are problems, you are on your own.

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Thank you, David, I'll definitely take a look into it. In the meanwhile, I just used the subversion from windows command prompt which works well with Tortoise. – Czechnology Jul 16 '12 at 10:21

There is a better way. Simply link the directory.

ln -s /cygdrive/c /C:

now it should work.

Credit goes to Mark Malaknov You can read it here:

http://markmal.blogspot.com/2012/11/how-to-use-cygwin-svn-and-tortoisesvn.html

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If you (re-)install TortoiseSVN and select the option to install the (Windows) command-line tools, but don't install the Cygwin/Linux version of these tools from the Cygwin installer (or remove them), then your Windows tools will still be available via Cygwin.

These should accept Windows paths as if you were invoking them from the Command Prompt (although you might have to put them in quotes to avoid the bash shell from interpreting them)

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Note: I've not tried this with a local repo myself; I prefer to run a local server as per David's suggestion - I usually just drop VisualSVN onto the windows box and set the repos up in that. – Rob Gilliam Dec 9 '13 at 16:45

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