Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My Rails models: task has_many positions.

Scenario: When I create a new position, it should create itself a task. I'd like to test that, and I'm doing it like this:

context "creating a new position" do
  let(:position) { create :position, name: 'Read some books', :task => nil }

  it "should create a simple task" do
    Task.find_by_name('Read some books').should be_nil # First should
    position # Execute let() block (FactoryGirl is lazy evaluating)
    Task.find_by_name('Read some books').should_not be_nil # Second (more relevant) should
  end
end

So how should I improve my test? The first "should" simply makes sure that there isn't already a Task, so we can be sure that creating the Position creates the Task. But this violates the "only one should per it block" principle. So what about this?

context "creating a new position" do
  let(:position) do
    position = create :position, name: 'Read some books', :task => nil
    Task.delete_all
    position
  end

  it "should create a simple task" do
    position # Execute let() block (FactoryGirl is lazy evaluating)
    Task.find_by_name('Read some books').should_not be_nil
  end
end

Or should I simply count on the fact that there shouldn't be such a task anyways (because a clean test db wouldn't have one)? Thanks for your opinions.

Update (Solution)

After some research I found the change matcher of RSpec:

let(:position) { create :position, name: 'Read some books', :task => nil }

it "should create a simple task" do
  # Thanks to FactoryGirl's lazy evaluation of let(), the position doesn't yet exist in the first place, and then after calling position in the expect{} block, it is created.
  expect { position }.to change{ Task.count(conditions: { name: 'Read some books' }) }.by(1)
end
share|improve this question
    
Create a task with an arbitrary, generated name. Ensure there's a new task and its name is the generated name. –  Dave Newton Jul 15 '12 at 17:06
    
Thanks, but I don't like arbitrary names too much. I found a bettersolution, see my Update above. –  Joshua Muheim Jul 15 '12 at 17:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

RSpec 2.11 allows you to pass a block to change, and it expects the return value of the block to be the thing that changes. I would expect this to work for you:

expect { position }.to change { Task.where(:name => 'Read some books').count }.from(0).to(1)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I found it out myself right before you added your answer. :) –  Joshua Muheim Jul 15 '12 at 17:26

What to Test

I will not address in detail whether the tests themselves are useful to any degree. To me, they seem to be exercising basic database functions rather than application logic, which is of marginal utility, but only you can really decide what's important to test.

Be Specific

In the example you give, there's no real reason to use a let block, which memoizes the variable. If only one test needs the record, instantiate it just in that specific test. For example:

context 'creating a new position' do
  it 'should be nil when the position record is missing' do
    Task.find_by_name('Read some books').should be_nil
  end

  it 'should successfully create a position' do
    create :position, name: 'Read some books', :task => nil
    Task.find_by_name('Read some books').should_not be_nil
  end
end

Alternatively, if you're trying to test how your application behaves when a record is missing, then go ahead and memoize a variable or create a record in a before block, but explicitly delete the record in that one specific test.

Multiple Contexts

Finally, if you're finding that you have too much state to set up in individual tests, that's usually a clue that you should consider splitting your tests into different contexts. For example, you might want to separate tests into one context that checks behavior when a record doesn't exist, and a separate context for when records do exist.

Like all things testing, it's an art more than a science. Your mileage may vary.

share|improve this answer
    
It's true, it really is an art, and I'm just diving right into it since some weeks. But I think you don't really understand what I'm testing, I'm testing a before_save filter which automatically creates a Task for a new Position, so this definitely isn't just basic db functions. Anyways, I solved my problem, and I'm also thankful for your comment. :) –  Joshua Muheim Jul 15 '12 at 17:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.