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I'm trying to create a doubly-linked list with the null object model. So far, I've implemented a method to add a node to the beginning of the list and a method to display the node. My problem is that the display function always displays 0. Can anyone point out where I've gone wrong and how to fix it? Also, am I on the right track to correctly implementing the null object model here?

Note: This is a school assignment. Please don't just post a solution without an explanation. I want to learn and understand what's going on here.

Edit: After fixing the display problem, I have another: When calling getHead() or getTail() with a list that is empty or has nodes, it keeps wanting to use self() from the node class, rather than the nullNode class (in the event of an empty list) or elementNode class (in the event of a list with nodes). I'm stuck on how to fix this.

If I print out the addresses of container.getNext() and container (for an empty list), both addresses are the same so shouldn't adding ->self() to the end call the self() method from the nullNode class?

class node {
public:

    node(){/* Do nothing */}

    node(int e){ element = e; }

    int getData(){ return element; }

    void setData(int e){ element = e; }

    friend class list;
protected:
    node* getNext(){ return next; }

    void setNext(node* n){ next = n; }

    node* getPrev() { return prev; }

    void setPrev(node* n){ prev = n; }

    node* self();

private:

    int element;
    node* next;
    node* prev;
};

class nullNode : public node{
public:
    nullNode(){/* Do nothing */}

    int getData(){ return NULL; }

    void setData(int e){ /* Do Nothing */ }

    node* getNext(){ return head; }

    void setNext(node* n){ head = n; }

    node* getPrev() { return tail; }

    void setPrev(node* n){ tail = n; }

    node* self(){ return NULL; }
private:
    node* head;
    node* tail;
};

class elementNode : public node{
public:
    elementNode(){/* Do nothing */}

    elementNode(int element){
        setData(element);
}

    int getData(){ return node::getData(); }

    void setData(int e){ node::setData(e); }

    node* getNext(){ return node::getNext(); }

    void setNext(node* n){ node::setNext(n); }

    node* getPrev() { return node::getPrev(); }

    void setPrev(node* n){ node::setPrev(n); }

    node* self(){ return this; }
};

class list{
public:

    list();

    node* getHead(){ return (container.getNext())->self(); }

    node* getTail(){ return (container.getPrev())->self(); }

    node* addHeadNode(int e);

    void removeNode(node* n);

    void insertBefore(node* n, int e);

    void insertAfter(node* n, int e);

    void displayNode(node *n);

private:

    nullNode container;
};

list::list()
{
    container.setNext(&container);
    container.setPrev(&container);
}

node* list::addHeadNode(int e)
{
    node* foo = new elementNode(e);

    foo->setPrev(&container);
    foo->setNext(container.getNext());
    container.getNext()->setPrev(foo);
    container.setNext(foo);
    return foo;
}

void list::displayNode(node* n)
{
    cout << "Node Data: " << n->getData() << endl;
}
int main()
{
    list myList;
    node* myNode;
    myNode = myList.addHeadNode(5);
    myList.displayNode(myNode);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
You should step through your code line-by-line in the debugger in order to inspect the values of variables as your program proceeds. Alternatively, you could add lots of print statements to achieve a similar effect. For example, if you inspect foo->getData() inside the addHeadNode() function, is it correct? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 15 '12 at 17:27

3 Answers 3

elementNode(int element)
{
    node e;
    e.setData(element);
}

What is this code doing? You create node e, but it appears to then be thrown away and not added to any list.

share|improve this answer

The problem hides in

elementNode(int element){
    node e;
    e.setData(element);
}

What is going on here? First you create an instance of the node class and then call its setData member function. Sure enough e is modified with the value of element but the very next moment both e and element are vanished out of existence because the scope where they were initialized has ceased to its end (terminated by }) while the information in element hasn't been saved anywhere.

However, if you replace the above code with

elementNode(int element){
    setData(element);
}

it calls the inherited setData member function, the value of element is saved, and the program outputs 5 as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that makes perfect sense. Thank you! I have another problem I don't understand. Edited original post. –  Derek Jul 15 '12 at 18:26

Your elementNode constructor is trying to initialize it's node part:

elementNode(int element){
  node e;
  e.setData(element);
}

You actually just construct an unrelated node then discard it.

What you want is to call your superclass constructor, which can be done in the subclass constructor's initialization list:

elementNode(int element) : node(element) {
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

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