Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C++11, we are able to declare a destructor to be auto generated:

struct X {
  virtual ~X() = default;
};

Also, we can declare a destructor to be pure virtual:

struct X {
  virtual ~X() = 0;
};

My question is: how to declare the destructor to be both auto generated and pure virtual? Looks like the following syntax is not correct:

struct X {
  virtual ~X() = 0 = default;
};

Neither is this one:

struct X {
  virtual ~X() = 0, default;
};

Nor this one:

struct X {
  virtual ~X() = 0 default;
};

EDIT: Some clarification on the purpose of the question. Basically I want an empty class to be non-instantiable base class, but derived class is instantiable, then the class must have a pure virtual destructor. But on the other hand, I don't want to provide the definition in a .cpp file. So I need some sort of mechanism equivalent to default. I wonder if anyone has an idea to solve the problem.

share|improve this question
2  
Can you do virtual ~X() = 0 {}? Now think again what you're trying to do. –  Xeo Jul 15 '12 at 18:20
4  
@Xeo: Yes you can. But not with that syntax; you have to provide a non-inline implementation. Any pure virtual function may have a default implementation - that simply means that non-abstract derived classes must implement the function, but may call the parent's default implementation as part of their implementation. –  JohannesD Jul 15 '12 at 18:22
    
@JohannesD: I know that, see my comment on Michal's answer, but = default is basically {} in-class (if you have no members). –  Xeo Jul 15 '12 at 18:23
1  
@Xeo: your comment is incorrect. I just tried out your comment, and compiler says: pure-specifier on function-definition. So basically pure virtual functions can only be defined out-of-class. –  icando Jul 15 '12 at 18:27
1  
My first comment was trying to tell you why your code will not work, the second part told you to think about the first part, which does not work. = default is basically equal to {} in-class, so your virtual ~X() = 0 = default; (or any variations) would basically be virtual ~X() = 0 {}, which is ill-formed. As such, the comment is correct. –  Xeo Jul 15 '12 at 18:44

1 Answer 1

In order to define a pure virtual method, you need a separate definition from the declaration.

Therefore:

struct X {
    virtual ~X() = 0;
};

X::~X() = default;
share|improve this answer
    
Here's a link to an Ideaone example that successfully compiles. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 15 '12 at 18:57
    
darn, you beat me to it while I was getting my copy of effective C++ (where this is shown using the old syntax) –  Johan Lundberg Jul 15 '12 at 18:57
2  
This answer is incorrect! You still need to put the line X::~X() = default; into the .cpp file, otherwise there will be multiple definition linking error. –  icando Jul 16 '12 at 0:14
2  
@icando unless you write inline; That's not implied when default is it? –  Dave Jul 16 '12 at 1:57
    
@Dave: it is not, but all methods defined within the class scope are inline by default so it is easy to get confused. –  Matthieu M. Jul 16 '12 at 12:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.