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Got a bit of an odd problem. I have the following code to do some basic parsing of a String:

    for (int i = 0; i < lines.size(); i++) {
        String line = lines.get(i);

        //get time
        int firstWhiteSpace = line.indexOf(" ");
        String time = line.substring(0, firstWhiteSpace);

//problem is here vvvv
            line = line.substring(firstWhiteSpace + 1, line.length());
//problem is here ^^^^

        //get client
        int firstColon = line.indexOf(":");
        String client = line.substring(0, firstColon);
        line = line.substring(firstColon + 1, line.length());

        ChatMessage chatMessage = new ChatMessage();
        chatMessage.setTime(time);
        chatMessage.setClient(client);
        chatMessage.setMessage(line);

        messages.add(chatMessage);
    }

So basically after I do line = line.substring(a, b) I would expect to get a substring of line between a (inclusive) and b (exclusive). However, if I print line I get the entire String prior to performing the substring operation. Curiously if I look at the debugger (Eclipse) then the value of the String IS the substring BUT the character array contains the entire String.

For example, if:

line = "Hello World"

and I do:

line = line.substring(0, 5);

then line now has a value of:

"Hello"

but the character array is:

[H, e, l, l, o, , W, o, r, l, d]

Hence, I'm a little confused. Apologies if I've missed something ridiculously stupid. Which is quite possible.

The full code, its not a very complicated class:

public class ChatParser { private static TS3ParserSettings settings;

public static void main(String[] args) {
    ChatParser.setSettings("C:/Users/*****/javaWorkspace/TS3Parser/src/data/settings.txt");
    ChatParser.parseChat();
}

public static void parseChat() {
    ArrayList<String> lines = TextParser.parseTextLines(settings.getSetting("chatLogPath"));
    ArrayList<ChatMessage> messages = new ArrayList<ChatMessage>();

    for (int i = 0; i < lines.size(); i++) {
        String line = lines.get(i);

        //get time
        int firstWhiteSpace = line.indexOf(" ");
        String time = line.substring(0, firstWhiteSpace);
        line = line.substring(firstWhiteSpace + 1, line.length());

        //get client
        int firstColon = line.indexOf(":");
        String client = line.substring(0, firstColon);
        line = line.substring(firstColon + 1, line.length());

        ChatMessage chatMessage = new ChatMessage();
        chatMessage.setTime(time);
        chatMessage.setClient(client);
        chatMessage.setMessage(line);

        messages.add(chatMessage);
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < messages.size(); i++) {
        System.out.println("TIME = " + messages.get(i).getTime() + " CLIENT = " + messages.get(i).getClient() + " MESSAGE = " + messages.get(i).getMessage());
    }
}

public static void setSettings(String path) {
    settings = SettingsParser.parseSettings(path);
}
}
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1  
What character array are you talking about? –  Hunter McMillen Jul 15 '12 at 18:45
1  
Where is the println()'s for the String or char[]? I have the feeling something is missing. Maybe a SSCCE –  David Kroukamp Jul 15 '12 at 18:46
    
Yes... can we have a look to your whole code? It would be easier to get what you are saying u post that complete code.. –  shalki Jul 15 '12 at 18:47
    
Store lines.size() in a variable and use that variable in for loop's condition. Performance tip..! –  Priyank Doshi Jul 15 '12 at 18:47
1  
What was the silly error? It's always good to leave the explanation here for people who might have made the same error... –  Carl Manaster Jul 15 '12 at 19:02

2 Answers 2

Since String objects are immutable, the compiler is free to share the underlying data. When you do a substring(), you create a new String reference object that points to the original string array but has a different starting offset and length.

As to the first example, print out the value of firstWhiteSpace and I think all will become clear.

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Ok thanks, that makes sense. The problem must be somewhere else. –  noise256 Jul 15 '12 at 18:52
    
I don't think that is the problem. The returned array should contain the string as-is. docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/… –  Martijn Courteaux Jul 15 '12 at 18:52
1  
@Martin - "returns a new string" only means that a new String object is returned. The compiler/jvm are free to reuse the underlying char array, as the data there can never be modified. –  Jim Garrison Jul 15 '12 at 18:54
    
No, you misread the javadoc. It says: "Converts this string to a new character array." –  Martijn Courteaux Jul 15 '12 at 18:55
    
I'm looking at the Java 7 Javadoc for String#substring(int,int) and don't see any thing about a "new character array". Those three words occur together only in the definition of toCharArray(). –  Jim Garrison Jul 15 '12 at 18:57

Your problem has nothing to do with immutability: If you have a collection/array of objects, changing the value of a local variable that holds a reference to on of the objects has no effect on the collection/array.

This code demonstrates:

ArrayList<String> strings = Arrays.asList("foo", "bar");
String localVar = strings.get(0); // "foo"
localVar = "hello"; // this only affects localVar
// strings is still {"foo", "bar"}


FYI, what you call an "array" is an ArrayList, which uses an array, but is not a java "array".

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