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I am building a web service using WCF. This service has to support REST.

Here is what I did so far:

I configured the app with a baseAddress, the mex endpoint and an additional endpoint which has a webhttpbinding.

Here is the service configuration:

<service name="ServiceLibrary.Service" behaviorConfiguration="myServiceBehavior">
    <endpoint 
        address="" 
        behaviorConfiguration="webHttp"
        binding="webHttpBinding" bindingConfiguration="" 
        contract="ServiceLibrary.IEvalService" >
    </endpoint>
    <endpoint address="mex" binding="mexHttpBinding" contract="IMetadataExchange"/>
    <host>
      <baseAddresses>
        <add baseAddress="http://localhost:8732/sdata/myApp/myContract/-/"/>
      </baseAddresses>
    </host>
  </service>

And here is the behavior configuration:

 <serviceBehaviors>
    <behavior name="myServiceBehavior">
      <serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="true"/>
      <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="false"/>
    </behavior>
    <behavior>
      <serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="true"/>
      <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="false"/>
    </behavior>
  </serviceBehaviors>
  <endpointBehaviors>
    <behavior name="webHttp">
      <webHttp/>
    </behavior>
  </endpointBehaviors>

I am setting up a service contract like this:

[ServiceContract]
public interface IEvalService
{
    [OperationContract]
    [WebGet(UriTemplate = "/employees('{MDNr}:{ANNr}')")]
    Atom10ItemFormatter GetEmployeeByPK(string MDNr, string ANNr);

    [OperationContract]
    [WebGet]
    string employees(string queryString);
}

And I am handling the operation contract in a separate class:

public class Service : IEvalService
{
    public Atom10ItemFormatter GetEmployeeByPK(string MDNr, string ANNr){return Employee.GetEmployeeByPK(MDNr, ANNr);}
    public string employees(string queryString)
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Query: " + queryString);
        return queryString;
    }

Both methods get called after executing the GET method.

I am calling the first one like this:

http://localhost:8732/sdata/myApp/myContract/-/employees('3:37')

It works perfectly, giving me the IDs, etc.

The second one I am calling like this:

http://localhost:8732/sdata/myApp/myContract/-/employees?where=name eq 'bla'

And here is where the trouble starts. The Method employees is getting called, but it receives no string. And I don't know why. This is exactly the same code, like in those tutorials, I just changed the names...

Does anyone see the mistake I obviously made? I would really appreciate any help.

One more thing: I am working with .Net 4.0 and am running this over the debugger so I can call the urls via firefox rest client? This is a service library project.

share|improve this question
    
I may be missing something more fundamental, but is there a reason you're not actually using WCF Data Services here? The example URLs look like you might be trying to do OData over a vanilla WCF service. Hopefully this doesn't come across as patronizing, but WCF Data Services is different than a plain old WCF service, and its primary function is to handle a number of the standard query combinations without requiring a bunch of custom code. –  Mark Stafford - MSFT Jul 16 '12 at 15:27
    
this is the first webservice i am trying to set up. I followed the directions from this video: channel9.msdn.com/Shows/Endpoint/… I have to follow a set of rules given from a coomunication protocol. thats why is used this, cuz it worked so far. you think i am on the wrong path? –  robidd Jul 16 '12 at 16:17
    
I'm not sure if you're on the wrong path; that's a tough determination for me to make. What I can say is that OData and WCF Data Services at least fit the examples that you've shown above. It's probably worth ten minutes of your time to go through the content on this page: odata.org/introduction. –  Mark Stafford - MSFT Jul 16 '12 at 18:37
    
mm i wasnt supposed to use odata... but is there anything really wrong about the way i am using this? it works so far pretty okay... –  robidd Jul 17 '12 at 18:24
    
Putting on my pre-Microsoft hat, I understand why there might be a blanket "don't use ____ because it's from Microsoft" statement, but in this case it kind of feels like recreating the wheel. (I certainly don't mean that to be offensive, just stating what I hope is obvious.) Can I ask what the rationale was behind not using OData, and whether it was "don't use OData" or "don't use WCF Data Services"? There are certainly a whole bunch of valid reasons not to use OData, but your use case appears to match pretty well from what I've seen. –  Mark Stafford - MSFT Jul 17 '12 at 20:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try to change the parameter's name:

string employees(string **where**);

or change the url:

http://localhost:8732/sdata/myApp/myContract/-/employees?**queryString**=name eq 'bla'

Answer to your comment:

  1. Make a single parameter named 'query' and then parse its value. In this case you are responsible for parsing the query from string to real query and execute it.
  2. Check the 'WCF Data Services'. It may help you querying data using URL.
share|improve this answer
    
thanks it worked –  robidd Jul 16 '12 at 16:05
    
How do i handle the parameter, if I dont know, if its going to be a where or for example an orderBy query? Or if there are more than one parameter passed. Like ?where=name eq ‘mm’ & orderBy firstname desc Is there a way to read everything what comes after the questionmark? –  robidd Jul 17 '12 at 14:17

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