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When I use Closure Compiler I get the following errors when compiling in advanced mode: (in simple- and Whitespace only mode the code gets not problems at all)

JSC_REDECLARED_VARIABLE: Redeclared variable: e at line 31 character 9
} catch (e) {
         ^
JSC_REDECLARED_VARIABLE: Redeclared variable: e at line 34 character 9
} catch (e) {
         ^

The code described by Closure Compiler as an error is the following:

function getXMLHttp() {
    var xmlHttp;
    try {
        xmlHttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
    } catch (e) {
        try {
            xmlHttp = new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP");
        } catch (e) {
            try {
                xmlHttp = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
            } catch (e) {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
    return xmlHttp;
}

Why this problem occurs when I use Advanced mode, I don't know. I have no idea why the compiler says this is an error as well.

(Quick note: This code is just a simple XMLrequest for an PHP file in a error catch handling for handling IE. All my JavaScript code works as it should be.)

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Use the variables e, f and g the catch blocks. See if that works. –  Blender Jul 15 '12 at 20:22
    
Why do you need to compile this in advanced mode? It results in no code. –  Esailija Jul 15 '12 at 20:31
    
@Esailija It makes the code smaller? –  Jason Stackhouse Jul 15 '12 at 21:40
    
@user1426486 Your code compiled to down to 0 bytes. Perhaps you should export some functions? Learn more I guess 0 bytes is smaller then. –  Esailija Jul 15 '12 at 21:42
    
@Esailija Woah... why dose it do that? –  Jason Stackhouse Jul 15 '12 at 21:52
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can easily get rid of it by using e, e2 and e3 for your exceptions. That's dirty but still a good workaround.

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The way you use e, there will be no problem and your code should work as expected, however, if you would want to do something like this:

try {
    xmlHttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
} catch (e) {
    try {
        xmlHttp = new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP");
    } catch (e) {
        try {
            xmlHttp = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
        } catch (e) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    console.log(e); // Now there is a chance that e refer to the "wrong" exception
}

The closure compiler anticipates this, and throws a warning about it, since you re-declare e for every catch-statement.

As ThiefMaster suggest, you could simply rename the variables to e2, e3 and so forth if you want to get rid of the warning.

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I will do that, but thanks for explayining this to me! –  Jason Stackhouse Jul 15 '12 at 21:41
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