Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to implement the comparable interface in Java for an object that I need to sort by two different columns/variables. I tried multiple approaches, and this one is the best so far:

public int compareTo(Object o) {
    Match m = (Match)o;
    int diff = m.matches - matches;
    if (diff == 0) {
        if (distance > m.distance) {
            return 1;
        } else if (distance < m.distance) {
            return -1;
        } else {
            return 0;
        }
    } else {
        return diff;
    }
}

but it still fails with

java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Comparison method violates its general contract!

Any ideas what I'm doing wrong?

Side note 1: NPEs/ClassCastExceptions are expected, if o is null or of an unsuitable class - that is not the issue here.

Side note 2: I know about the change in the sorting algorithm in JDK 1.7, but I don't really see where I'm violating the contract here. So turning off the exception seems like the wrong solution.

share|improve this question
2  
Did you override the equals() method? –  Jon Lin Jul 15 '12 at 21:19
1  
@Ray Toal: distance is a double. –  Dexter Jul 15 '12 at 21:32
2  
You don't need to override equals(), was just wondering because the behavior of it and compareTo() can lead to violating the general contract. For example returning true for .equals() but returning non-zero for compareTo(). –  Jon Lin Jul 15 '12 at 21:38
1  
Without NaNs, you should be good: ideone.com/u1HD9. With NaNs, ideone's Java 7 still works for me: ideone.com/OsixW. –  Ray Toal Jul 15 '12 at 21:40
1  
Full stacktrace: ideone.com/7GV37 matches is an int, distance is a double, calculated using 2 lat/lng pairs. Would that result in NaNs? –  Dexter Jul 15 '12 at 21:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since you say distance is a double, you likely have the same problem as described here:

Java error: "Comparison method violates its general contract!"

Perhaps:

public int compareTo(Object o) {
    Match m = (Match)o;
    int diff = m.matches - matches;
    if (diff == 0) {
        return Double.compare(distance, m.distance);
    } else {
        return diff;
    }
}

However ideally you should use the built-in comparison methods as I state below. The above code is an example of the "minimum change needed", illustrating the key problem.

Using existing comparison methods

Also, as @fabian-barney states in his answer, you should avoid taking the direct difference, and instead utilise the built-in comparison methods. So you should have something like:

public int compareTo(Object o) {
    Match m = (Match) o;
    return m.matches == matches ? Double.compare(m.distance, distance) : Integer.compare(m.matches, matches);
}

This way, Double.compare will handle the NaN values for you. For any number x (other than NaN) Double.compare(x, Double.NaN) == -1 will return true (i.e., NaN is considered greater than any other number).

Note here that you are OK using == with ints but it is more complicated with double because Double.NaN != Double.NaN. However, new Double(Double.NaN).equals(Double.NaN) is true. See Why is Java's Double.compare(double, double) implemented the way it is? for a nice discussion.

Contract breaking:

To see an example of why your original implementation might break the contract if you have NaNs, see Java compareTo documentation. There we have:

Finally, the implementer must ensure that x.compareTo(y)==0 implies that sgn(x.compareTo(z)) == sgn(y.compareTo(z)), for all z.

So imagine you have x = NaN and y = 5 and z = 6, then:

  1. x.compareTo(y) == 0 (since NaN > 5 and NaN < 5 are false)
  2. x.compareTo(z) == 0 (same reasoning)
  3. y.compareTo(z) == -1 (y < z).

So 2 and 3 (+sgn) are not equal as required.

share|improve this answer
1  
Indeed, this does work, though I'm not sure why - or where I had gotten any NaNs in my list. –  Dexter Jul 15 '12 at 21:46
    
I've updated my answer with an example of where the contract is broken if NaNs are present. I can't say where they'd be present in your code or is that is definitely the issue :( –  MGwynne Jul 15 '12 at 22:07
1  
You were right - there are NaNs in the calculated values for the distance: ideone.com/R9lTB –  Dexter Jul 15 '12 at 22:08
    
Glad it worked out! Don't forget to check out @fabian-barney 's answer regarding correct use of compare methods, if you haven't already. I'd update my answer fully to take it into account, but I'd rather ensure he gets his deserved votes :). –  MGwynne Jul 15 '12 at 22:11
1  
@MGwynne Feel free to add it. I am sure it'll further improve your already very good answer. +1 from the beginning btw –  Fabian Barney Jul 16 '12 at 8:23

Do not return the diff in compareTo(...) method. This is not valid for all values. For example the result of Integer.MAX_VALUE - Integer.MIN_VALUE is negative.

Rewrite it to something like:

public int compareTo(Object o) {
    Match m = (Match) o;
    return m.matches == matches ? Double.compare(m.distance, distance) : Integer.compare(m.matches, matches);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.