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I'm trying to create an object using a constructor from a subclass but I can't assign values to that object in the subclass Constructor.

Here is the superclass.

public class Bike
{
    String color = "";
    String type = "";
    int age = 0;

    public static void main (String [] args)
    {
    }

    public Bike (String s, int i)           // Constructor
    {
        color = s;
        age = i;
    }

    public void PrintBike ()
    {
        if (type == "")
        {
            System.out.print(" You didn't give the proper kind of bike."); 
        }
        else
        {
            System.out.print(" Your bike is a " + type + " bike. \n");
        }
    }
}

This is the subclass.

public class BikeAdv extends Bike
{
    private String type;

    public BikeAdv (String color, int age, String BikeType)
    {
        super (color, age);
        type = BikeType;
    }
 }

Here is the class that calls the constructor.

public class Green
{
    public static void main (String [] args)
    {
        Bike greenBike = new BikeAdv ("Green", 20, "Mountain");
        greenBike.PrintBike();
    }
}

When I run the class "Green", the output is " You didn't give the proper kind of bike." whereas I would expect to see "Your bike is a Mountain Bike".

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have declared these attributes without explicit visibility:

    String color = "";
    String type = "";
    int age = 0;

Also, you have type redeclared in BikeAdv, that is probably an error (you don't need to).

If you want to have these attribute only accessible from its class, then you should declared them private. But, in that case, you have to parametrize the constructor to be able to modify all of them. Or maybe create setters for them (be aware that this way you will grant accessibility from outside the class).

    private String color = "";
    private String type = "";
    private int age = 0;

If you want them to be unmodifiable from outside its class, but accessible from its subclasses, then declare them as protected:

    protected String color = "";
    protected String type = "";
    protected int age = 0;

As you can see, there are a lot of possibilities. Check them out here:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/accesscontrol.html

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1  
This fixed it. I'll read the link more in depth. Thanks! – YellowTellow Jul 15 '12 at 22:54

The type field in the subclass shadows the type field in the superclass. The field in the superclass is never populated, and that's the one being checked.

If you simply remove the field in the subclass, the assignment there will populate the superclass field, and your code will likely work as you expect.

As noted in other answers though, it would be better to have the fields private or protected according to your need rather than default visibility.

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The class Bike is not abstract or an interface, that means that all of it's methods are as they said in the Bike class. When you assign greenBike to be a Bike, not a BikeAdv you tell it to use the methods in the Bike class, instead of the BikeAdv class. Your best bet would be to make Bike abstract and leave the PrintBike void without a body.

Also: you never pass the BikeType String to the super class so there is no way it can receive it.

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