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I want a script that works on linux to rename files from this form i.e., Yahoo Babel Fish - Persistent Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability.jpg to that form Yahoo-Babel-Fish-Persistent-Cross-Site-Scripting-Vulnerability.jpg

It only deletes every space and change it with hyphen and if it was a hyphen between two spaces, it deletes the spaces only, like you can see in this part "Fish - Persistent" to "Fish-Persistent"

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closed as off topic by Nemo, forsvarir, drak0sha, Emil Vikström, Joe Jul 16 '12 at 20:11

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4 Answers

Given you want to process every file in your current directory, you could do this in two lines:

for f in *; do mv "$f" "$(echo $f | sed 's/ /-/g')"; done
for f in *; do mv "$f" "$(echo $f | sed 's/---/-/g')"; done

There's probably a way to do it in one line but I can't think of it at the moment.

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+1: You could combine the two sed expressions into a single command: sed -e 's/ /-/g' -e 's/---/-/g' –  Adrian Pronk Jul 16 '12 at 0:20
    
This looks like a pretty expensive operation, even with only one sed. Anyway, you can use a herestring instead of that echo and pipe to save a few operations. –  kojiro Jul 16 '12 at 0:25
    
Thank you guys.... Another quick question is there any website or book that you recommend me to see in order to learn script writing on linux ? –  I.el-sayed Jul 16 '12 at 0:31
    
1  
Your forgot to quote $f –  geirha Jul 16 '12 at 6:30
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Here is a pure-bash solution that takes advantage of bash's array and extglob features:

shopt -s extglob
oIFS="$IFS" # save the original IFS
for file in *.jpg; do # Or whatever pattern you like
    target=( ${file//+(-)/ } ) # Break the filename into an array on spaces, after turning - into space. 
    IFS='-' # Temporarily set the internal field separator into a dash so we can join on dashes.
    mv "$file" "${target[*]}"
    IFS="$oIFS"
done
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I'd go with "${file//+([ -])/-}". –  geirha Jul 16 '12 at 6:34
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for file in *.jpg ; do file2="${file// - /-}"; file2="${file2// /-}"; echo mv "$file" "$file2" ;done

remove the echo if that's what you want.

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This won't work for files named like foo- bar.jpg. You'd get foo--bar.jpg. –  kojiro Jul 16 '12 at 0:46
    
...It only deletes every space and change it with hyphen and if it was a hyphen between two spaces, it deletes the spaces only... –  Derek Schrock Jul 16 '12 at 1:03
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Here are some benchmarks for the three answers that existed at the time I wrote this. Feel free to extend:

$ ./rename_bench 
setting up
timing ext

real    0m35.453s
user    0m6.006s
sys 0m27.417s
setting up
timing sed

real    1m17.498s
user    0m15.223s
sys 0m56.376s
setting up
timing straight

real    0m38.352s
user    0m6.028s
sys 0m28.254s
$ ./rename_bench 
setting up
timing ext

real    0m36.234s
user    0m6.030s
sys 0m28.270s
setting up
timing sed

real    1m16.467s
user    0m15.277s
sys 0m56.194s
setting up
timing straight

real    0m33.538s
user    0m5.911s
sys 0m26.672s

The actual benchmark script:

#!/bin/bash

setup() {
    cd $(mktemp -dt "foo") &&
    touch 'a - '{0..10000}'buzz.jpg'
}
ext_rename() {
    shopt -s extglob
    oIFS="$IFS" # save the original IFS
    for file in *.jpg; do # Or whatever pattern you like
        target=( ${file//+(-)/ } ) # Break the filename into an array on spaces, after turning - into space. 
        IFS='-' # Temporarily set the internal field separator into a dash so we can join on dashes.
        mv "$file" "${target[*]}"
        IFS="$oIFS"
    done
}

sed_rename() {
    for f in *.jpg; do
        mv "$f" "$(sed -e 's/ /-/g' -e 's/---/-/g' <<< "$f")"
    done
}

straight_rename() {
    for file in *.jpg; do
        file2="${file// - /-}"
        file2="${file2// /-}"
        mv "$file" "$file2"
    done
}

echo "setting up"
setup
echo "timing ext"
time ext_rename
echo "setting up"
setup
echo "timing sed"
time sed_rename
echo "setting up"
setup
echo "timing straight"
time straight_rename
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