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Easiest way to convert the result of Throwable.getStackTrace() to a string that depicts the stacktrace?

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4  
As your question is written, jqno's answer is a better answer than Brian Agnew's. However, you accepted Brian's. Were you overly specific in asking how to "convert the result of Throwable.getStackTrace()"? If so, can you edit your question body to more accurately reflect what you were after? –  toolbear Jan 21 '10 at 19:56
4  
Because jqno's answer actually uses the Throwable.getStackTrace() method that you specified in your question, whereas Brian doesn't. He uses Throwable.printStackTrace() instead. –  Stijn de Witt Jan 31 '12 at 18:45
4  
Including a library, as amar suggests, for 3 lines of code (as in D. Wroblewski's answer) is completely absurd and a true sign of a novice coder. –  stolsvik May 13 '13 at 7:05
6  
Just about every Java project should include Apache commons-lang. It includes many convenience methods implementing extremely common development needs. –  Russell Silva Aug 15 '13 at 21:32
8  
@StijndeWitt Those three lines of code almost certainly need factoring out of the place you've called them. Since you don't know where to put them, they'll go in your utility toolbox with all the other useful snippets. Bingo! you've just reinvented guava / commons-lang / whatever... only not so well. Import a sensible utilities library instead, and save reinventing the wheel. The true sign of a novice is thinking you can do a better job than the library writers. –  Andrew Spencer Oct 22 '13 at 8:12

14 Answers 14

up vote 303 down vote accepted

One can use the following method to convert an Exception stack trace to String. This class is available in Apache commons-lang-2.2.jar

org.apache.commons.lang.exception.ExceptionUtils.getStackTrace(Throwable)

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111  
One line that needs an external library... –  Stijn de Witt Jan 31 '12 at 8:30
21  
@Stijn - to be fair (I wrote the current highest voted answer below) it's worth looking at commons-lang for a lot more functionality –  Brian Agnew Jan 31 '12 at 10:10
10  
@StijndeWitt Commons Lang is pretty common. It's already present in most of my projects/proyects at work. –  Hugo May 21 '12 at 14:54
5  
@Hugo thanks, was going to use the StringWriter to avoid adding a new library--turns out it's already a dependency of 3 of my dependencies. So to the rest, check if you have it already. –  Nathanial Apr 10 '13 at 0:53
8  
@MartinAsenov - following your logic you'd never use such a library, would you ? You wouldn't use it unless you're already using it ? –  Brian Agnew Aug 28 '13 at 16:31

Use Throwable.printStackTrace(PrintWriter pw) to send the stack trace to an appropriate writer.

StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(sw);
t.printStackTrace(pw);
sw.toString(); // stack trace as a string
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238  
If you don't like including an external library for something as small and simple as this, use this answer. –  Stijn de Witt Jan 31 '12 at 8:31
22  
If you use one answer this year, make it this one. –  alex Nov 27 '12 at 3:20
2  
@PiotrFindeisenj Author of the answer did not reinvent the wheel. –  Code Enthusiastic Mar 8 '13 at 9:29
5  
This is the best answer –  David Williams Sep 27 '13 at 18:41
3  
This does trim the stack trace, the same way printStackTrace(). All exceptions in the stack are visible but for each exception the stack may be trimmed. Anyone requiring the entire trace should consider this. –  Laila Agaev Nov 29 '13 at 20:20

This should work:

StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
e.printStackTrace(new PrintWriter(sw));
String exceptionAsString = sw.toString();
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2  
Concise and efficient, works perfectly, no need of external libs, only pure Java. As someone says in a well-known ad, "what else ?". –  Benj Sep 16 '13 at 23:13
9  
Nice, more concise that Brian's answer ... but why didn't you suggest edit?? –  samthebest Nov 20 '13 at 10:45
public String stackTraceToString(Throwable e) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (StackTraceElement element : e.getStackTrace()) {
        sb.append(element.toString());
        sb.append("\n");
    }
    return sb.toString();
}
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This is good if you just want the stack trace (as the OP asks) –  Peter Lawrey Jul 19 '09 at 11:48
1  
I'd go with an extension of this approach if you want to trim the trace, e.g. pass a maxLines parameter and only add that many lines to the trace –  Rich Seller Jul 19 '09 at 12:28
    
The Parentheses after e.getStackTrace are missing. public static String stackTraceToString(Exception e) { StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); for (StackTraceElement element : e.getStackTrace()) { sb.append(element.toString()); sb.append("<br />"); } return sb.toString(); } –  rlc Oct 20 '11 at 8:59
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Not sure, but I think this will not print the stack trace of the root cause exception. –  apoorv020 May 25 '12 at 10:07
2  
Whatever you do, don't trim the trace. It has happened to me many, many times that I looked at a stack trace in the GlassFish logs that had the useful parts trimmed away. –  cayhorstmann Sep 12 '12 at 22:25

For me the cleanest and easiest way was:

import java.util.Arrays;
Arrays.toString(e.getStackTrace());
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10  
The code is clean, but the output is not. You have to do a .replaceAll(", ", "\n") in the end. However you lose the indentation that printStackTrace proposes. –  fury Jan 9 '12 at 4:03
3  
Great answer, thank you. I voted it up :) –  xchiltonx Feb 18 '13 at 22:54

If you are developing for android, a far easier way is to use this:

import android.util.Log;

String stackTrace = Log.getStackTraceString(exception); 
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Log is undefined. –  Hugo May 21 '12 at 14:56
1  
sorry. actually that is an option for android. –  Vicky Kapadia May 22 '12 at 7:20
6  
You should specify at least the import if it's not a well-know standard java class. –  Hugo May 22 '12 at 14:14
1  
@VickyKapadia: Improve your answer by stating where that class comes from. Or just remove it, because as it stands, it is .. a lie? –  stolsvik May 13 '13 at 7:04
    
Could you hint on example output? Is it the very same format as what getStackTrace produces? –  naxa Aug 21 at 15:39

If you have the actual Throwable instance, google Guava can do it too with Throwables#getStackTraceAsString.

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The following code allows you to get the entire stackTrace with a String format, without using APIs like log4J or even java.util.Logger:

catch (Exception e) {
    StackTraceElement[] stack = e.getStackTrace();
    String exception = "";
    for (StackTraceElement s : stack) {
        exception = exception + s.toString() + "\n\t\t";
    }
    System.out.println(exception);
    // then you can send the exception string to a external file.
}
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ya but its a bit bulky dont you think? in any reasonable sized project logging framework is a must so why bother –  mzzzzb Oct 24 '12 at 17:19
    
This one is not giving the error message in the beginning. can be added though –  kommradHomer Nov 13 '13 at 11:07

Inspired by @Brian Agnew:

public static String getStackTrace(Throwable t) {
    StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
    t.printStackTrace(new PrintWriter(sw));
    return sw.toString();
}
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Assuming you don't care about nested exceptions

import java.io.PrintWriter;
import java.io.StringWriter;

public class StackTraceUtils {
    public static String stackTraceToString(StackTraceElement[] stackTrace) {
        StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
        printStackTrace(stackTrace, new PrintWriter(sw));
        return sw.toString();
    }
    public static void printStackTrace(StackTraceElement[] stackTrace, PrintWriter pw) {
        for(StackTraceElement stackTraceEl : stackTrace) {
            pw.println(stackTraceEl);
        }
    }
}

It's also useful when you want to print the current thread stack trace without creating instance of Throwable

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Here is a version that is copy-pastable directly into code:

import java.io.StringWriter; 
import java.io.PrintWriter;

//Two lines of code to get the exception into a StringWriter
StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
new Throwable().printStackTrace(new PrintWriter(sw));

//And to actually print it
logger.info("Current stack trace is:\n\t" + sw.toString());
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I don't know why people answer such conversions when there is a easy util. Just use this,

String stackTrace = Log.getStackTraceString(ex);
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3  
This is android.util.Log, right? So it's Android-only. –  JW. Jun 17 at 5:26
    
My apology, yes this is only for Android developers :(. Thanks for your point... @JW. –  Hissain Jun 17 at 5:42
    
duplicate of stackoverflow.com/a/10380001/611007 –  naxa Aug 21 at 15:38

The clever sniping in the first set of comments was very amusing, but it really depends on what you are trying to do. If you don't already have the correct library, then 3 lines of code (as in D. Wroblewski's answer) is perfect. OTOH, if you already have the apache.commons library (as most large projects will), then Amar's answer is shorter. OK, it might take you ten minutes to get the library and install it correctly (less than one if you know what you're doing). But the clock is ticking, so you may not have the time to spare. Jarek Przygódzki had an interesting caveat--"If you don't need nested exceptions".

But what if I do need the full stack traces, nested and all? In that case, the secret is to use apache.common's getFullStackTrace (see http://commons.apache.org/proper/commons-lang/javadocs/api-2.6/org/apache/commons/lang/exception/ExceptionUtils.html#getFullStackTrace%28java.lang.Throwable%29)

It saved my bacon. Thanks, Amar, for the hint!

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If you don't want to use an external library and you're not developing for Android, you could create an 'extension' method like this:

public static String getStackTraceString(Throwable e) {
    return getStackTraceString(e, "");
}

private static String getStackTraceString(Throwable e, String indent) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    sb.append(e.toString());
    sb.append("\n");

    StackTraceElement[] stack = e.getStackTrace();
    if (stack != null) {
        for (StackTraceElement stackTraceElement : stack) {
            sb.append(indent);
            sb.append("\tat ");
            sb.append(stackTraceElement.toString());
            sb.append("\n");
        }
    }

    Throwable[] suppressedExceptions = e.getSuppressed();
    // Print suppressed exceptions indented one level deeper.
    if (suppressedExceptions != null) {
        for (Throwable throwable : suppressedExceptions) {
            sb.append(indent);
            sb.append("\tSuppressed: ");
            sb.append(getStackTraceString(throwable, indent + "\t"));
        }
    }

    Throwable cause = e.getCause();
    if (cause != null) {
        sb.append(indent);
        sb.append("Caused by: ");
        sb.append(getStackTraceString(cause, indent));
    }

    return sb.toString();
}
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