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I have the following array:

 (
     [0] => Array
         (
             [schedules] => Array
                 (
                     [monday] => 1
                     [tuesday] => 1
                     [wednesday] => 1
                     [thursday] => 1
                     [friday] => 1
                     [saturday] => 0
                     [sunday] => 1
                 )

         )

 )

I'd like to sort the elements of this array with the first key being the day tomorrow. Let's say today was Wednesday. I'd want my array to look like this:

 (
     [0] => Array
         (
             [schedules] => Array
                 (
                     [thursday] => 1
                     [friday] => 1
                     [saturday] => 0
                     [sunday] => 1
                     [monday] => 1
                     [tuesday] => 1
                     [wednesday] => 1
                 )

         )
 )

I already have the weekday available (e.g. a string 'thursday'). It gets passed into the function I'm working with.

Any suggestions for achieving this type of sorting? Thanks!

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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you convert the day to a number 0-6 you can array_shift and array_push that many times to move the previous days to the end of the array.

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you have the simplest solution for my case. best answer goes to you if you can tell me how to get the day, as a number (0-6) of the 'current tomorrow' –  kwikness Jul 16 '12 at 17:22
    
Sorry for the late reply... date('N')%7 will do that for you. N returns a number 1-7, so date('N')%7 will be the the next day in our 0-6 numbering. –  Adam Bergmark Jul 20 '12 at 2:59

You can get the day of the week via the date function. Sunday is 0, Monday is 1, and so forth.

$weekday = date("w");

Then, I suggest using the uksort function to sort the array relative to its keys, which takes a callback function as a sorting guideline.

uksort($schedules, function ($a, $b) use ($weekday) {
    // convert each day to a number 0-6 and compare to $weekday
});
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Try using uksort(). You can compare dates in the callback function described in the link.

For example:

function compare($a, $b) { 
  date(strtotime($a)) - date(strtotime($b)); 
}

uksort($array, "compare"); 

Here's proof of it working

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How does it take into account the OPs restriction of "sort the elements of this array with the first key being the [week]day [of] tomorrow"? –  nickb Jul 16 '12 at 2:48
1  
The code I used below is also a uksort, but with a small tweak to cater for the 'sort from today onwards...' request. –  Fluffeh Jul 16 '12 at 3:52

First you need a list in the correct order, which you can grab through the DateTime class. Then, as you loop over the old array, use the correct order as the key to sort the array, like so:

function sort_by_weekday( $input_array) {
    $now = new DateTime( "tomorrow", new DateTimeZone('America/New_York'));
    $interval = new DateInterval( 'P1D'); // 1 Day interval
    $period = new DatePeriod( $now, $interval, 7); // 7 Days

    $sorted_array = array();
    foreach( $period as $day) {
        $weekday = strtolower( $day->format( 'l'));

        foreach( $input_array as $key => $value) { 
            $sorted_array[ $key ][ $weekday ] = $value[ $weekday ]; 
        }
    }
    return $sorted_array;
}

You can see it working in the demo.

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If you combine a uksort with a simple function, this is a surprisingly easy solution.

Obviously turning the day name strings into ints is needed, but if the day is prior to the current weekday, simply add seven to the variable, that will guarantee that the array is sorted as 'after' even if the day of the week would imply otherwise.

<?php

    $a='sunday'; // Example Input
    $b='saturday'; // Example Input

    function funnyDateCompare($a, $b)
    {
        $a=date('w',strtotime($a));
        $b=date('w',strtotime($b));
        if($a<=date('w'))
        {
            $a+=7;
            // First value is less than or equal to today. 
            // Adding 7 to the answer.
        }
        return ($a - $b);
    }

    uksort($array, "funnyDateCompare")
?>
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I wrote a solution which does not cast the days to a date/time type, but instead uses a closure and uksort. Essentially, every key passed to uksort is compared against the position of the "tomorrow" key, and if it is "before" tomorrow, it is "promoted" into the future (+= 7), then a simple comparison result is used.

edited for performance:

Edits motivated by comment by @nickb (thanks!)

<?php

function sortedWithNext($days, $tomorrow) {
    $index_dictionary = array_combine(array_keys($days), range(0,6));
    $index_of_tomorrow = $index_dictionary[$tomorrow];
    $compare_function = function($k1, $k2) use ($index_dictionary, $index_of_tomorrow) {
         $index_of_k1 = $index_dictionary[$k1];
         $index_of_k2 = $index_dictionary[$k2];
         if($index_of_k1 < $index_of_tomorrow) 
           $index_of_k1 += 7;
        if($index_of_k2 < $index_of_tomorrow) 
           $index_of_k2 += 7;
        return $index_of_k1 - $index_of_k2;
    };
    uksort($days, $compare_function);
    return $days;
}




$daysPool = array(
'monday'=>1,
'tuesday'=>1,
'wednesday'=>1,
'thursday'=>1,
'friday'=>0,
'saturday'=>1,
'sunday'=>1,
);

$tomorrow = 'thursday';

$sortedDays = sortedWithNext($daysPool, $tomorrow);

var_dump($sortedDays);

performance notes

I tested using 100,000 iterations, this method spends roughly 2.2e-5 seconds to sort the array. The curious will check the first version of this answer to find a less performant version which took about twice as long, 5.5e-5 seconds.

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1  
Since array_search is O(n) and you're repeatedly calling both array_search and array_keys in a callback for sorting, this is likely not very efficient at all. –  nickb Jul 16 '12 at 2:49
    
That's a fairly easy refactor (at lease one of them...) –  ctrahey Jul 16 '12 at 3:22
    
And with another small refactor, all heavy functions have been removed from the closure; thanks for the input, @nickb :-) –  ctrahey Jul 16 '12 at 3:39

This is working for me, just a simple loop:

$array = array();

$month = date('m');
$day = date('d');
$year = date('Y');

for($i=1; $i<=7; $i++){
    $array[] = date('l',mktime(0,0,0,$month,($day+$i),$year));
}

Output array looks like: (If today is a tuesday)

array(
    (int) 0 => 'Wednesday',
    (int) 1 => 'Thursday',
    (int) 2 => 'Friday',
    (int) 3 => 'Saturday',
    (int) 4 => 'Sunday',
    (int) 5 => 'Monday',
    (int) 6 => 'Tuesday'
)
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