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I know that

Make figures out automatically which files it needs to update, based on which source files have changed. It also automatically determines the proper order for updating files, in case one non-source file depends on another non-source file.

As a result, if you change a few source files and then run Make, it does not need to recompile all of your program. It updates only those non-source files that depend directly or indirectly on the source files that you changed.

Now I want to know whether I can ask Make to list out these modified sources?

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Do you want Make to list the modified sources it's using to build whatever it's building? Or do you want a new target that lists all source files that have been modified since you last ran Make? –  Beta Jul 16 '12 at 12:11
    
A new target would be more preferable –  Roy Jul 16 '12 at 14:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You'll need a dummy file which uses all of your sources as prerequisites:

mod_list: foo.c bar.cc baz.cpp
    @echo modified sources: $?
    @touch $@

You can keep the list of sources as a separate variable:

WATCHED_SOURCES = foo.c bar.cc baz.cpp
mod_list: $(WATCHED_SOURCES)
    @echo modified sources: $?
    @touch $@

Or use a wildcard to look at all sources present:

WATCHED_SOURCES = $(wildcard *.c *.cc *.cpp *.whatever)
mod_list: $(WATCHED_SOURCES)
    @echo modified sources: $?
    @touch $@
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Thanks a lot @beta. This worked for me. –  Roy Jul 17 '12 at 13:03

One easy way is to use the dry run option to make, which is either -n or --dry-run or a couple of other choices, depending in part on exactly which implementation you are using. This tells you what make would do if executed which will, inter alia, show you what source files it would re-compile.

It's all in the man pages.

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You basically need to get make to update a timestamp file every time you run it. Once you have that, the rest is trivial.

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