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What is the difference between a synchronized method and synchronized block in Java ?

I have been searching the answer on the Net, people seem to be so unsure about this one :-(

My take would be there is no difference between the two, except that the synch block might be more localized in scope and hence the lock will be of lesser time ??

And in case of Lock on a static method, on what is the Lock taken ? What is the meaning of a Lock on Class ?

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7 Answers

up vote 33 down vote accepted

A synchronized method uses the method receiver as a lock (i.e. this for non static methods, and the enclosing class for static methods). Synchronized blocks uses the expression as a lock.

So the following two methods are equivalent from locking prospective:

synchronized void mymethod() { ... }

void mymethod() {
  synchronized (this) { ... }
}

For static methods, the class will be locked:

class MyClass {
  synchronized static mystatic() { ... }

  static mystaticeq() {
    syncrhonized (MyClass.class) { ... }
  }
}

For synchronized blocks, you can use any non-null object as a lock:

synchronized (mymap) {
  mymap.put(..., ...);
}

Lock scope

For synchronized methods, the lock will be held throughout the method scope, while in the synchronized method, the lock is held only during the synchronized block (otherwise known as critical section). In practice, the JVM is permitted to optimize by removing some operations out of the synchronized block execution if it can prove that it can be done safely.

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I read some time ago (lost the source) that synchronized on method can be easier to optimize internally by JVM than synchronized on block even if that block encapsulates the whole method body. Could be interesting micro-benchmark to try. –  Gregory Mostizky Jul 19 '09 at 15:02
1  
In the lock scope, you probably meant "... while in the synchronized block, the lock is held only during the synchronized block" and not "... while in the synchronized method the lock is held only during the synchronized block" –  mrvincenzo Oct 21 '10 at 8:47
1  
@Gregory Mostizky According to this article, JVM creates less bytecode for a synchronized method when compared to a synchronized block. ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-5things15/… –  K.U. Nov 9 '10 at 18:06
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A synchronized method is shorthand. This:

class Something {
    public synchronized void doSomething() {
        ...
    }

    public static synchronized void doSomethingStatic() {
        ...
    }
}

is, for all intents and purposes, equivalent to this:

class Something {
    public void doSomething() {
        synchronized(this) {
            ...
        }
    }

    public static void doSomethingStatic() {
        synchronized(Something.class) {
            ...
        }
    }
}

(Where Something.class is the class object for the class Something.)

So indeed, with a synchronized block, you can be more specific about your lock, and more fine-grained about when you want to use it, but other than that there's no difference.

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Yes, that is one difference. The other is that you can acquire a lock on other objects than this.

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The key difference is this: if you declare a method to be synchronized, then the entire body of the method becomes synchronized; if you use the synchronized block, however, then you can surround just the "critical section" of the method in the synchronized block, while leaving the rest of the method out of the block.

If the entire method is part of the critical section, then there effectively is no difference. If that is not the case, then you should use a synchronized block around just the critical section. The more statements you have in a synchronized block, the less overall parallelism you get, so you want to keep those to the minimum.

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Quick follow-up: Would that mean that a synchronized block is less expensive to use than a synchronized method? –  Everyone Sep 1 '09 at 5:54
    
If the synchronized block includes all the contents of the function, then there is no difference. However, if you use a synchronized block, you can surround just the critical section (perhaps leaving some of the computation out of the synchronized region). If you do that, your program will run faster. –  Michael Aaron Safyan Sep 1 '09 at 9:27
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A synchronized method locks on the object instance the method is contained in.

Where as a synchronized block can lock on ANY object - typically a mutex obect defined as an instance variable. This allows more control over what locks are in operation.

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I would like to give breaf discription about The main difference between Static and non-sattic Synchronized methods

static synchronized methods and non-static synchronized methods are completely independent of each other and both of them can run at the same time by different threads for the simple reason that both these methods are governed by different locks which may be acquired at the same time by two different threads.

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When static method is synchronized, then lock is obtained on the Object of respective class. This object is creating at the time of loading the class. Your answer states that there are 2 different locks, but it never informs the nature of your locks and objects at which locks are applied. Can you improve your answer a little bit with more information ab out static locks? –  Vishal Jul 11 '13 at 2:28
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The synchronization is the capability to control the access of multiple threads to shared resources. Without synchronization, it is possible for one thread to modify a shared resource while another thread is in the process of using or updating that resource.

There two synchronization syntax in Java Language. The practical differences are in controlling scope and the monitor. With a synchronized method, the lock is obtained for the duration of the entire method. With synchronized blocks you can specify exactly when the lock is needed.

Basically, synchronized blocks are more general, and synchronized methods can be rewritten to use synchronized blocks:

class Program {
  public synchronized void f() {
   .........
  }
}



is equivalent to

class Program {
  public void f() {
     synchronized(this){
       ...
     }
  }
}
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