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I am reading the book - "C Interfaces and Implementations" by David Hanson. This exercise questions seems interesting and am unable to find a solution:

On some systems, a program can invoke a debugger on itself when it has detected an error. This facility is particularly useful during development, when assertion failures may be common.

Can you provide a short example on how to invoke a debugger.

void handle_seg_fault(int arg)
{
    /* how to invoke debugger from within here */
}

int main()
{
    int *ptr = NULL;
    signal(SIGSEGV, handle_seg_fault);
    /* generate segmentation fault */
    *ptr = 1;
}
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Whatever you do, make sure you only use async signal safe functions from within your signal handler. For example, of all the exec variants only execve and execle are safe to execute in the context of a (async signal catching) signal handler. Now, wether it is generally wise to do that at all (in the face of a "state corrupting singal" like SIGSEGV) is another thing. I'd go with (a) an external debugger or (b) inspect the coredump post mortem. –  Christian.K Jul 16 '12 at 7:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Elaborating on Christian.K's comment, fork()ing a debugger in the face of something like a SIGFPE or SIGSEGV might not be the best of ideas, because...

  1. your program is potentially corrupt to begin with, making the fork() unsafe;
  2. you might want to use something different for debugging than what the program has hardcoded;
  3. the average application user does not know how to handle a debugger;
  4. anyone competent with a debugger will usually prefer the coredump over the auto-invoked debugger.

A coredump that I can copy to a testbed beats a debugger instance at my customer's workplace any time of the day. A debugger interface makes for a lousy end-user error message.

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I think it's good idea to use debugger attach only for debugging reasons. –  Dmitry Poroh Jul 16 '12 at 8:14

I have got this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>

void exception_handler(int)
{
    int pid = getpid();
    if (fork() != 0) {
        while(true) sleep(1000);
    }
    char buf[20];
    sprintf(buf, "--pid=%u", pid);
    execlp("gdb", "gdb", buf, NULL);
    exit(-1);
}

int init()
{
    if (signal(SIGSEGV, exception_handler) < 0) {
       return errno;
    }
    if (signal(SIGILL, exception_handler) < 0) {
        return errno;
    }
    if (signal(SIGFPE, exception_handler) < 0) {
        return errno;
    }
    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    if (int rc = init()) {
       fprintf(stderr, "init error: %s\n", strerror(rc));
       return 1;
    }
    *((char*)(0)) = 1;
}
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Thanks for your help. –  user138645 Jul 16 '12 at 13:10

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