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Consider this code:

public <T> List<T> meth(List<?> type)
{
   System.out.println(type); // 1
   return new ArrayList<String>(); // 2
}

It does not compile at line 2, saying that List is required.

Now, if it's changed to:

public <T> List<?> meth(List<T> type)
{
   System.out.println(type); // 1
   return new ArrayList<String>(); // 2
}

It does compile. Why? I thought the difference between declaring a generic type with T and using the wildcard was that, when using the wildcard, one cannot add new elements to a collection. Why would <?> allow a subtype of List to be returned? I'm missing something here, what's the explicit rule and how it's being applied?

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What is your original goal? What do you want to accomplish with your method? –  kd304 Jul 19 '09 at 14:09
    
Nothing really, this isn't part of a project, I just wanna understand java generic methods. I' reading this right now java.sun.com/j2se/1.5/pdf/generics-tutorial.pdf –  omgzor Jul 19 '09 at 14:11
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The difference is in the return type declaration. List<String> is not a subtype of List<T>, but it is a subtype of List<?>.

List<?> makes no assumptions regarding its type variable, so the following statements are valid:

List<?> l0 = new ArrayList<String>();
List<?> l1 = new ArrayList<Object>();
List<? extends Number> ltemp = null;
List<?> l2 = ltemp;

List<T> assumes that the type argument will be resolved in the context of client (e.g. type use), when you declared it as List<String> or List<Object>. Within the method body, you cannot make any assumptions about it either.

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I don't think the last compiles. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 19 '09 at 15:11
    
Thanks. Corrected it. –  notnoop Jul 19 '09 at 15:34
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In the first case, T is not necessarily a superclass of String. If you choose a T like Integer and call the method, it'll fail; so it won't compile. However, the second will compile as surely, any ArrayList<String> is a valid List of something.

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As said earlier, String isn't a subtype of T, so it's why it does not work. However, this code works :

public <T> List<T> meth(List<?> type)
{
   System.out.println(type); // 1
   return new ArrayList<T>(); // 2
}

and is more in the idea of what you want, I think.

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