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I would like to test that instance of ChildClass calls something_interesting while omitting call to BaseClass.my_method

class BaseClass
  def my_method *args, &block
  end
end

class ChildClass < BaseClass
  def my_method first_arg, second_arg
    something_interesting
    super first_arg, second_arg
  end
end

If I write my test like this:

subject = ChildClass.new
subject.should_receive :something_interesting
BaseClass.any_instance.stub :my_method
subject.my_method

I get error:

ArgumentError: wrong number of arguments (3 for 2)

Any ideas why is that so? How to stub it out correctly?

share|improve this question
    
I would move "something interesting" to its own method and test it separately. (Another fun option that removes the need for stubbing is to monkey patch BaseClass.) –  froderik Jul 16 '12 at 9:33
    
@froderik it is in separate method. i just need to make sure that my_method calls it. –  Arnis L. Jul 16 '12 at 10:08
    
Aha - I would rely on integration tests for that. I tend to avoid mocking and stubbing as much as possible. –  froderik Jul 16 '12 at 14:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could stub super:

describe ChildClass do
  it 'calls something_interesting' do
    subject.should_receive(:something_interesting)
    subject.stub(:super)
    subject.my_method 'a', 'b'
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, are you sure this works? It makes sense to me and it's simple and elegant but I'm trying to use it in a spec (task.stub(:super=>false)) but the subject of the spec seems to keep using the real method, not the stubbed one. Not sure if I'm doing something wrong. –  Aldo 'xoen' Giambelluca Dec 12 '13 at 10:58
1  
No, I'm afraid you're right. The test passes but the stub doesn't work; the method in BaseClass is called nevertheless. Feel free to downvote. –  zetetic Dec 12 '13 at 20:44

I had to play with this a bit. This may be silly but I think it is a rather explicit way to do it (without stubbing):

require 'rspec'

class BaseClass
  def my_method *args, &block
    raise 'hell'
  end
end

class ChildClass < BaseClass
  def my_method first_arg, second_arg
    something_interesting
    super first_arg, second_arg
  end

  def something_interesting
  end
end


describe ChildClass do
    it "should work" do
        class BaseClass
            def my_method *args, &block
            end
        end
        subject = ChildClass.new
        subject.should_receive :something_interesting
        subject.my_method 'two', 'args'
    end
end

Monkey patching may be a bit evil but is a nice tool to have when testing.

share|improve this answer

First of all, there's no connection between intances BaseClass.any_instance and ChildClass.new, you've just stubed method in instance and expecting stubbing in another instance.

Second, testing is not meant to test internal parts of object. If you're dealing with BaseClass' object, do test on its methods. If you're dealing with ChildClass' object, check everything that this object can come up with, don't go deep inside.

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"there's no connection between intances" good, I understand then why it throws that argument error. "don't go deep inside" -> and that is why I want to stub it out, still unsure how to do that though. –  Arnis L. Jul 16 '12 at 10:11

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