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I am a C# developer and I am highly habituated to initialize a variable in the same declaration statement as

ClassA myClass = new ClassA();

To my point of view, this practice is concise, more readable and looks neat.

Now, I am learning java for android. So far whatever java snippet I am facing, everywhere I see that the snippet writer is using code like this:

ClassA myClass;
myClass = new ClassA();

Now, I understand that, my question may sound silly, but really curious to know, is there any impact / effect or is there any difference between these 2 approach ? I mean, if I compile a code in java like this :

ClassA myClass = new ClassA();

is there anything about it that matters internally ? I just want to be sure that I am not doing anything wrong.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, this isn't a C#/Java difference, and your habit is appropriate. There's simply no good reason to split declaration and initialization unless you have to due to the initialization being conditional (if/else).

I'm sure there's plenty of Android code which is written appropriately, just as there's plenty of bad C# out there. It sounds like you're just getting unlucky (or perhaps reading lots of code by the same author, who has an unfortunate style).

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Both approaches are valid and nobody can stop to initialize the variable at the time of construction.

In 2nd approach you construct the object on demand when you need it .

If you have parametrized constructor .

ClassA myClass = new ClassA(xyz);

In above approach your creating reference with default object.

ClassA myClass;

//    some condition 
 myClass=new ClassA(abc);
// some other

 myClass=new ClassA(xyz);
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Thanks. But, I think, I should not declare a variable until I need it. To my point of view, hanging a pointer/reference far from the usage makes the code smell. Anyway, of course the practice and choice differs by programmers to programmers. –  Emran Hussain Jul 16 '12 at 8:40

Not sure what snippets you looked at but there is nothing preventing you to do :

ClassA myClass = new ClassA();

The difference is that java won't allow you to ignore exceptions as C# would so in a lot of cases you have something like this:

try{
 ClassA myClass = new ClassA();
}
catch(Exception e)
{
}

In that case, if you like to use the myClass variable outside of the try block, you'll have to define it outside the try block and initialize it in the try:

ClassA myClass = null;

  try{
     myClass = new ClassA();
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
    }
    if(myClass != null){
        myClass.doSomething();
    }
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"java won't allow you to ignore exceptions as C# would"--- thanks for the info, I did not know that, I will check this out. –  Emran Hussain Jul 16 '12 at 8:36

ClassA myClass;

At this point, it wont create a new java object until you call "new" keyword. But the point is, if your variable is global dont use direct declaration.

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The only "difference" it may make is when your myClass is used in try-catch blocks.

ClassA myClass;

try {
    myClass = new ClassA(); // exception may occur here
} catch {
    // catch and process exception
} finally {
    // always do something
}

doSomethingWith(myClass);

If you declare and initialize in try block, then it won't be visible outside of it.
That's the only reason for doing so, from my POV, ATM.

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