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Consider a following snippet of code:

class MyClass {
  var a = _
  var b = _
  ...
  var y = _

  val z = (for {
    a0 <- someMethodReturningFuture
    b0 <- someMethodReturningFuture(a0)
    ...
    z0 <- someMethodReturningFuture(y0)
  } yield {
    a = a0
    b = b0
    ...
    y = y0
    someCalculation(y)
  }).result
}

Is it possible to perform such an initialization but using vals instead of vars (somehow)? The point is, I don't want to block and wait for every intermediate result, just for the last one.

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1  
Note that putting methods resulting futures in the for comprehension which not actually depend on all previous values is not a good idea, since the start of their computation will be deferred even if logically they could be started. –  ron Jul 16 '12 at 14:48
1  
Also, if not needed, avoid blocking and .result. Return the Future instead and let the caller chain or get the result if it really needs it (there are situations where the caller only wants to react asynchronously, so the blocking is totally unnecessary) –  ron Jul 16 '12 at 14:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Unless you have more than 22 variables:

val (a, b, c, d, ..., v) = (for {
  a0 <- someMethodReturningFuture
  b0 <- someMethodReturningFuture(a0)
  ...
  u0 <- someMethodReturningFuture(t0)
} yield {
  (a0, b0, ..., u0, someCalculation(u0))
}).result
share|improve this answer
    
I had a thought of it, but didn't like the limit of 22 values. It's not that I'm going to have more than 22, it just doesn't look that cool to me :) –  Sergey Weiss Jul 16 '12 at 8:49
1  
Well, you can always do some fancy match nesting when you need more than 22: val (abc@(_ ,_ ,_), d, e) = ((a0, b0, c0), d0, e0); val (a, b, c) = abc. –  Debilski Jul 16 '12 at 9:03
2  
An advice from Jack Bauer for having more than 22 values: refactor, NOOW! :) –  ron Jul 16 '12 at 14:46

Could you delay the result evaluation by using lazy values ? Something like:

class MyClass {

  lazy val a = myFutures.a.result
  lazy val b = myFutures.b.result

  private val myFutures = new AnyRef {
    val a = someMethodReturningFuture
    val b = a.map( a0 => someMethodReturningFuture(a0) )
  }

}

All futures are created at initialisation without blocking, but you will block the first time you actually try to use a result.

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Looks like a good solution. But lazy evaluation introduces some overhead, doesn't it? –  Sergey Weiss Jul 16 '12 at 11:26
    
Not really. It is handled by a simple bitmap field. I did some benchmark of lazy evaluation on another similar problem and the overhead is not measurable. –  paradigmatic Jul 16 '12 at 11:44
    
The problem with lazy vals is of course that they won’t even try to calculate the result in the background unless asked for it. –  Debilski Jul 16 '12 at 12:25
    
@Debilski. It depends of the future implementation you are using, but most I've used start to compute when as soon as the future is defined. The computation itself is not behind a lazy val, only the get operation. –  paradigmatic Jul 16 '12 at 13:16
    
@paradigmatic: Ok, but only if you access the object, I think. Otherwise this will be lazy as well. –  Debilski Jul 16 '12 at 13:22

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