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I have a method that takes an array of queries, and I need to run them against different search engine Web API's, such as Google's or Yahoo's. In order to parallelize the process, a thread is spawned for each query, which are then joined at the end, since my application can only continue after I have the results of every query. I currently have something along these lines:

public abstract class class Query extends Thread {
    private String query;

    public abstract Result[] querySearchEngine();
    @Override
    public void run() {
        Result[] results = querySearchEngine(query);
        Querier.addResults(results);
    }

}

public class GoogleQuery extends Query {
    public Result querySearchEngine(String query) { 
        // access google rest API
    }
}

public class Querier {
    /* Every class that implements Query fills this array */
    private static ArrayList<Result> aggregatedResults;

    public static void addResults(Result[]) { // add to aggregatedResults }

    public static Result[] queryAll(Query[] queries) {
        /* for each thread, start it, to aggregate results */
        for (Query query : queries) {
            query.start();
        }
        for (Query query : queries) {
            query.join();
        }
        return aggregatedResults;
    }
}

Recently, I have found that there's a new API in Java for doing concurrent jobs. Namely, the Callable interface, FutureTask and ExecutorService. I was wondering if this new API is the one that should be used, and if they are more efficient than the traditional ones, Runnable and Thread.

After studying this new API, I came up with the following code (simplified version):

   public abstract class Query implements Callable<Result[]> {
        private final String query; // gets set in the constructor

        public abstract Result[] querySearchEngine();
        @Override
        public Result[] call() {
            return querySearchEngine(query);
        }
    }

public class Querier {   
        private ArrayList<Result> aggregatedResults;

        public Result[] queryAll(Query[] queries) {
            List<Future<Result[]>> futures = new ArrayList<Future<Result[]>>(queries.length);
            final ExecutorService service = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(queries.length);  
            for (Query query : queries) {
                futures.add(service.submit(query));  
            }
            for (Future<Result[]> future : futures) {  
                aggregatedResults.add(future.get());  // get() is somewhat similar to join?
            }  
            return aggregatedResults;
        }
    }

I'm new to this concurrency API, and I'd like to know if there's something that can be improved in the above code, and if it's better than the first option (using Thread). There are some classes which I didn't explore, such as FutureTask, et cetera. I'd love to hear any advice on that as well.

share|improve this question
    
Looks good to me, not sure I would change anything in your second example. In your first example I would extend Runnable and not Thread but that's just nitpicking. –  Gregory Mostizky Jul 19 '09 at 15:12
    
+1, It is good enough for me. –  kd304 Jul 19 '09 at 15:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Several problems with your code.

  1. You should probably be using the ExecutorService.invokeAll() method. The cost of creating new threads and a new thread pool can be significant (though maybe not compared to calling external search engines). invokeAll() can manage the threads for you.
  2. You probably don't want to mix arrays and generics.
  3. You are calling aggregatedResults.add() instead of addAll().
  4. You don't need to use member variables when they could be local to the queryAll() function call.

So, something like the following should work:

public abstract class Query implements Callable<List<Result>> {
    private final String query; // gets set in the constructor

    public abstract List<Result> querySearchEngine();
    @Override
    public List<Result> call() {
        return querySearchEngine(query);
    }
}

public class Querier {   
    private static final ExecutorService executor = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();

    public List<Result> queryAll(List<Query> queries) {
        List<Future<List<Result>>> futures = executor.submitAll(queries);
        List<Result> aggregatedResults = new ArrayList<Result>();
        for (Future<List<Result>> future : futures) {  
            aggregatedResults.addAll(future.get());  // get() is somewhat similar to join?
        }  
        return aggregatedResults;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Changing to cached thread pool might not be the best option, as your application is IO-bound, as most search engines are really fast and will respond promptly. –  kd304 Jul 19 '09 at 15:27
    
@kd304: Indeed, the search engines that I'm using are quite fast (Google and Yahoo, currently). However, I'm using lots of queries, hence the need for concurrency. What is your advice on this ? From what I've read on the javadoc of the newCachedThreadPool method, it seems to fit my purposes. But then again, I'm quite new to this API. –  João Silva Jul 19 '09 at 15:39
    
@Avi: Thank you very much for the suggestions! –  João Silva Jul 19 '09 at 15:40
    
@JG: Hard to say, as there is no adaptive pool available in Java, which would adjust its size based on the I/O to CPU ratio. A heuristic approach would be to measure the wait to response, response delivery time and response processing time, then use a fixed pool size to interleave them. On my 100MBit/2 Core computer, the optimum performance is achieved by using size 10 pool for processing. –  kd304 Jul 19 '09 at 16:57

As a futher improvement, you could look into using a CompletionService It decouples the order of submitting and retrieving, instead placing all the future results on a queue from which you take results in the order they are completed..

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Since the application can only continue in this case after every task is completed, a CompletionService might not be appropriate here. –  Avi Jul 19 '09 at 15:26
    
@Avi: I disagree, it's just not that nice as future.get(). –  kd304 Jul 19 '09 at 15:28
    
@kd304: What method of CompletionService would you use, to get all results of a set of tasks? –  Avi Jul 19 '09 at 15:40
    
Something like excCmpSrv.take().get(), where you have to be carefull not to take() if there aren't any submitted Futures left (it'll wait for a new one that doesn't come).. Using poll or counting the number of submitted Callables is a way of working around this –  Tim Jul 19 '09 at 16:36

Can I suggest you use Future.get() with a timeout ?

Otherwise it'll only take one search engine being unresponsive to bring everything to a halt (it doesn't even need to be a search engine problem if, say, you have a network issue at your end)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. What is the typical timeout value that is used for this kind of operations? –  João Silva Jul 19 '09 at 16:31
    
I think you need to ask yourself how long you'd be prepared to wait :-) Make it configurable and set it to (say) 10x the normal response time. –  Brian Agnew Jul 19 '09 at 16:32
    
I think that the right layer in the code for the timeout is not Future.get(), it is the network (HTTP?) call to the search engine itself. If the search engine times out, better it should be caught there, and not tie up a thread which is no longer needed. –  Avi Jul 20 '09 at 9:25
    
That assumes (!) that you're talking HTTP. In the higher, more abstract areas of the code base I wouldn't necessarily make that assumption. However, I think you're right in that setting a timeout on the HTTP operations is always a good idea, and then throwing an appropriate exception. So I would set some timeout in both the Future.get() and the HTTP connection. Whether they're the same value is another matter. –  Brian Agnew Jul 20 '09 at 9:28

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