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I'm trying to compare InputStream.read() vs InputStream.read(byte[] b) in terms of performance.

Is InputStream.read(byte[] b) faster in some way, given the read(b, off, len) method for class InputStream simply calls the method read() repeatedly?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You shouldn't confuse what is the default behaviour of InputStream and what most of its subclasses do. A principle of OO design is that sub-classes can change the behaviour of a method for that implementation.

From InputStream - read(byte[]) calls read() repeatedly.

public int read(byte b[], int off, int len) throws IOException {
   // code removed

        for (; i < len ; i++) {
            c = read();

   // code removed
}

From BufferedInputStream - read(byte[]) does not call read().

public synchronized int read(byte b[], int off, int len) throws IOException {
   // code removed
        int nread = read1(b, off + n, len - n);
   // code removed
}

private int read1(byte[] b, int off, int len) throws IOException {
   // code removed
            return getInIfOpen().read(b, off, len);
   // code removed
}

From FileInputStream - read(byte[]) does not call read().

public int read(byte b[], int off, int len) throws IOException {
    return readBytes(b, off, len);
}

private native int readBytes(byte b[], int off, int len) throws IOException;

While InputStream will read one byte at a time, almost all the implementations will pass read(byte[]) to the same method in the underlying stream.

Note: the implementations for read(byte[], int, int) are different in all three cases.

What i mean to ask more clearly is: Let's say i want to read 20 bytes, Reading one byte at a time will hit underlying stream (e.g. file system) every time in a loop that means 20 times..ok Now reading array of 20 bytes in one go, i.e using read(byte[] 20), Now that's gonna hit underlying stream (e.g. file system) one time or 20 times..?? (as it's given: read(byte[] b) method is also going to call the method read() repeatedly 20 times) ??

Whether you use BufferedInputStream or FileInputStream, one read(byte[]) results in atmost one system call to read into the byte[].

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PeterLawrey: Thanks for that well distinguished explanation .. So does that mean all 3 methods of InputStream will read atmost one byte at a time, irrespective of the number of bytes we specify in read(byte[]) ?? –  Ashish Kataria Jul 16 '12 at 11:26
2  
No, I am trying to demonstrate at length and in detail why this is NOT the case. It is not clear to me why you might believe this could be the case. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 16 '12 at 11:33
    
Thanks.. Now I got that.. –  Ashish Kataria Jul 16 '12 at 12:13
    
one more thing, if using BufferedInputStream rather, any advantage of creating a byte buffer and reading with read(byte[]) method, as opposed to reading it byte by byte? –  Ashish Kataria Jul 16 '12 at 12:19
    
There is much less advantage. It can still be slightly faster to use read(byte[]) as this calls BufferedInputStream less often. Note: if you are reading large buffers like 16KB or more, using a BufferedInputStream might not help (if its buffer is smaller) –  Peter Lawrey Jul 16 '12 at 12:25

Use whichever you find most convenient in your case but remember to wrap your InputStream with BufferedInputStream.

Without buffering single read() will hit underlying stream (e.g. file system) every time you read. With buffering the same read() loads a chunk (e.g. 4KiB) and buffers it. Obviously reading from disk (even if some lower-lever OS/hard disk caching is present) is much slower.

Therefore read(byte[] b) is better only if your stream is not buffered - or if you really want to read more than one byte.

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Reading it a character/byte at a time (that is InputStream.read()), or reading it a byte/char array a block at a time..what's the difference when read(byte[] b) method is also going to call the method read() repeatedly byte/char array a block declared times? –  Ashish Kataria Jul 16 '12 at 10:16
    
@ Tomasz Nurkiewicz: thanks but exclude the case of BufferedInputStream. If we only talk about InputStream..then both methods would result in equal performance..is it true to say? –  Ashish Kataria Jul 16 '12 at 10:24
    
@AshishKataria You're just repeating the original question here, and he's already answered it. If you interpose a BufferedInputStream, there are no single-byte read operations into the operation, that being what it is for. –  EJP Jul 16 '12 at 10:36
    
@EJP..thanks But Forget about BufferedInputStream for an instance: What i mean to ask more clearly is: Let's say i want to read 20 bytes, Reading one byte at a time will hit underlying stream (e.g. file system) every time in a loop that means 20 times..ok Now reading array of 20 bytes in one go, i.e using read(byte[] 20), Now that's gonna hit underlying stream (e.g. file system) one time or 20 times..?? (as it's given: read(byte[] b) method is also going to call the method read() repeatedly 20 times) ?? –  Ashish Kataria Jul 16 '12 at 10:40
1  
@AshishKataria You are citing an abstract class. Please cite a concrete implementation class that doesn't override that method. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 16 '12 at 10:55

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