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Since we can throw anything with the throw keyword in Javascript, can't we just throw an error message string directly?

Does anyone know any catch in this?

Edit:

Let me add some background to this: Very often, in the Javascript world, people relies on parameter checking as opposed to using the try-catch mechanism, so it makes sense to only throw fatal errors with throw. Still, to be able to catch some system Errors, I have to use a different class for my own errors and instead of creating a subclass of Error, I think I should just use String.

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While it's possible, does it make sense? I'd rather catch an error than a string. –  Rob W Jul 16 '12 at 9:59
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It is okay to throw whatever you like, but keep in mind that if the catch is outside of your own code, it might expect a full Error instance and not a plain string.

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You can throw errors with messages, you know.

try {
    throw new Error("This is an error");
} catch (e) {
    alert(e.message); // This is an error
}

But you can actually throw strings:

try {
    throw "This is an error";
} catch (e) {
    alert(e); // This is an error
}
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Sorry for not making the questions clear. I know these all work, but I am interested in the potential problems with using Strings directly as opposed to using an Error object. –  billc.cn Jul 16 '12 at 12:21
    
Ah, ok, then just have a look to Ianzz's comment. It sums up all the caveats in that. But my advice is still to throw Error objects with custom messages. It saves you the trouble to check for the error type to tell 'your' errors from other natively-generated errors... Unless, of course, you want to do that on purpose (then maybe re-throwing the Error objects in the catch scope). –  MaxArt Jul 16 '12 at 15:41
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