Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on python and I'm stuck on this issue.

Input (there is a tuple):

a = (0, 1)

Output:

a = 0.1
share|improve this question
    
Can you show other examples and outputs? Do you really want to convert the parts to strings, concatenate with the dot, and convert to float? –  pepr Jul 16 '12 at 10:41

3 Answers 3

Single digits and only two elements

>>> a = (0, 1)
>>> a[0] + a[1] * 0.1
0.1

Multiple single digits

>>> from itertools import count
>>> a = (0, 1)
>>> sum(n * 10 ** i for i, n in zip(count(0, -1), a))
0.1
>>> a = (0, 1, 5, 3, 2)
>>> sum(n * 10 ** i for i, n in zip(count(0, -1), a))
0.15320000000000003   

Using reduce (for Py 3.0+ you will need: from functools import reduce)

>>> a = (0, 1, 5, 3, 2)
>>> reduce(lambda acc, x: acc * 0.1 + x, reversed(a))
0.1532

Using the decimal module

>>> from decimal import Decimal
>>> a = (0, 1, 5, 3, 2)
>>> Decimal((0, a, -len(a) + 1))
Decimal('0.1532')

Any two numbers

>>> a = (0, 1)
>>> float('{0}.{1}'.format(*a))
0.1

Any numbers

>>> a = (0, 1, 5, 3, 2)
>>> float('{0}.{1}'.format(a[0], ''.join(str(n) for n in a[1:])))
0.1532

There may be some floating point inaccuracies, which you could fix by using Decimals eg.

>>> sum(Decimal(n) * Decimal(10) ** Decimal(i) for i, n in zip(count(0, -1), a))
Decimal('0.1532')
share|improve this answer
    
The first example can be written more briefly as float('{0}.{1}'.format(*a)). –  pepr Jul 16 '12 at 10:39
    
@pepr my bad I forgot that. –  jamylak Jul 16 '12 at 10:40
    
I did not say it is bad. Actually, it was less cryptic than *a :) –  pepr Jul 16 '12 at 10:44

Assuming the elements of your list a are single digit 0-9, you can use maths:

>>> a[0] + a[1] * 0.1
0.10000000000000001

or convert to strings, concatenate and convert back to float:

>>> float(str(a[0])+'.'+str(a[1]))
0.10000000000000001
share|improve this answer
    
The first example would not work for (1, 100). –  pepr Jul 16 '12 at 10:31
    
the "easy way" will also only work with the second value of the tuple being in range 0 to 9 –  Filip Roséen - refp Jul 16 '12 at 10:32
    
@pepr +refp - true, possibly a rash assumption on my part, adjusted text. –  fraxel Jul 16 '12 at 10:36
from math import log
a = (x, y)    
a[0] + a[1] / float(10 ** (int(log(a[1], 10)) + 1))

will evaluate to the number

x.y

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.