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I searched stackoverflow but got contradictory answers:

Why should I reuse XmlHttpRequest objects?

Ajax-intensive page: reuse the same XMLHttpRequest object or create new one every time?

Also, there's a recommendation on w3schools.com :

If you have more than one AJAX task on your website, you should create ONE standard function for creating the XMLHttpRequest object, and call this for each AJAX task.

Why this recommendation? I'm instead using a global XMLHttpRequest object on my page for handling all Ajax tasks.

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3 Answers 3

You misunderstood W3School's recommendation. I'll highlight the relevant part:

If you have more than one AJAX task on your website, you should create ONE standard function for creating the XMLHttpRequest object, and call this for each AJAX task.

It says that you use one AJAX function to fetch requests. This function will deal with the inconsistencies between IE and other browsers. XMLHttpRequest in standard-compliant browsers, and ActiveXObject in IE.

I recommend to use multiple XHR objects. With one global xhr object, your application can only deal with one request at a given time. It's also error-prone (eg. XMLHttpRequest launches multiple times without initiating the onreadystatechange function).

W3schools meant something like:

function createXHR() {
    try {
        return new XMLHttpRequest();
    } catch (e) {
        try {
            return new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
        } catch (e) {
            return new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP");
        }
    }
}
var xhr = createXHR();
xhr.open('get', '/test', true);
xhr.send();

Although it's better to create a function which handles requests, such as jQuery.ajax.

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I think he understood the recommendation quite well, unless he edited his question since then. Quote: " I'm instead using a global XMLHttpRequest object" -- instead means as opposed to the recommendation, which obviously he understood to mean not a single global but rather multiple instances. –  nafg Jun 5 '13 at 6:42

It is best to use different objects for each XHR you are making. Even if there's a way of doing it, avoid it! There's no problem with creating new object for each request. If you are worried about memory leak or something of that sort, do not worry, they are all properly GC`ed.


If you have more than one AJAX task on your website, you should create ONE standard function for creating the XMLHttpRequest object, and call this for each AJAX task.

It actually means that you have one function that creates a new object and returns it every time you call it. It something like:

function newXHR(){
    return a new instance of XHR();
}
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The recommendation you highlight is saying you should have one FUNCTION which handles AJAX, rather than specifically one XMLHTTPRequest object.

I would use a different one for each question.

The common argument against this concerns the overheads involved in setting up XHRs. However this is going to be pretty much negligible in any site that uses AJAX as it was intended (i.e. not as a labouring substitute for web sockets) and, in any case, much of the same overheads would apply with re-using an XHR. You'd still have to open the connection, fire it, attach listeners etc.

Browsers vary in terms of how many connection gateways are allowed at a given time, so it's up to the browser to control what XHRs can do what. In other words, you don't have to worry about managing this aspect.

Finally, there's nothing stopping you manually deleting the XHRs after you've used them, provided they are deletable (properties of an object rather than variables).

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