Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there some framework similar to underscore that allows me to run async methods on collections.

Something like _.each(collection, itemCallback, doneCallback).

For example:

_.each(items, function(item, token){
    item.someProperty = null;
  }, function(err){
     console.log("The loop is done");
  });

Edit: async.js actually doesn't solve the problem. For example the following code

<script type="text/javascript" src="async.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">

var arr = ["a","b","c"];

async.forEach(arr, function(item, met){
    console.log(item);
},
function(err){
});
console.log("Done");

</script>

prints a b c Done

While I want it to print Done a b c

I can do it with underscore deffer but maybe there is some other lib that can do it without wrappers.

share|improve this question
2  
Async.js to the rescue. :) It's funny that you used async name and didn't know about async module. :) –  freakish Jul 16 '12 at 10:22
    
You are right :). I am using Async.js for control flow and somehow I missed the collections section entirely. –  Buzzy Jul 16 '12 at 10:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Async.js module will do the trick. Your example is just too fast for you to fully notice it is actually working as you will expect. Here is an example with a small delay added so you can notice the actual order of execution:

async.each([0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9], function(item, callback) {
  setTimeout(function() {
    console.log('>', item);
    callback();
  }, 2 * Math.random() * 1000);
}, function(err) {
  console.log('> done');
});

console.log(':)');

And the output:

:)
> 4
> 5
> 2
> 7
> 8
> 3
> 0
> 1
> 9
> 6
> done

Also, to really do it asynchronous you might consider to use Web Workers; but for now Async.js provides you a really simple way to do something similar (but not actual Web Workers) named queue:

var q = async.queue(function(item, callback) {
  setTimeout(function() {
    console.log('>>', item);
    callback();
  }, 2 * Math.random() * 1000);
}, 5);

q.drain = function() {
  console.log('>> done');
};

q.push([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]);

console.log('B)');

And the output:

B)
>> 1
>> 2
>> 5
>> 6
>> 4
>> 3
>> 0
>> 7
>> 8
>> 9
>> done

And if finally you run both simultaneously, here is an example of the output:

:)
B)
>> 2
> 3
>> 4
>> 1
> 8
>> 6
> 7
> 1
> 4
>> 3
> 0
> 2
>> 7
>> 5
> 6
> 5
> 9
> done
>> 8
>> 0
>> 9
>> done
share|improve this answer
    
This answer seems to be deprecated. The Async.js docs don't say anything about a async.forEach function. –  bzupnick Dec 31 '13 at 14:00
    
@bzupnick its just called Each now. Thanks Erick for the explanation. –  Jacinto Jan 5 at 22:03
    
Yep I bet they changed it to get distance from native forEach that actually blocks I/O –  Maziyar Aug 17 at 13:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.