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In the first program below there is no error.But for the second program there is an error. Why is that so?

First program:

#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{
int k=8;
int m=7;
k<m?k=k+1:m+1;
printf("%d",k);
}

Second program:

#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{
int k=8;
int m=7;
k<m?k=k+1:m=m+1;
printf("%d",k);
}
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I am not getting any error..Post the error please? –  james Jul 16 '12 at 10:28
    
lvalue required as left operand of assignment is the error given –  Dhatri Jul 16 '12 at 10:32
1  
I think you have uncovered an error in gcc's implementation. File a bug, and add parentheses around both sides of your conditional to work around the issue. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 16 '12 at 10:33
    
@dasblinkenlight I think he doesn't uncovered any bug in gcc, see my answer. –  ouah Jul 16 '12 at 10:53
    
@ouah You're right, the reason it worked on "some compilers" was that these were compilers from a different language (I mean C++ of course :) Very good find! –  dasblinkenlight Jul 16 '12 at 12:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The conditional operator has higher precedence than the assignment operator. You need extra parentheses to have the desired precedence.

k < m? k = k + 1 : m = m + 1;

is evaluated as

((k < m) ? (k = k + 1) : m) = m + 1;

Add parentheses to have the correct precedence:

(k < m) ? (k = k + 1) : (m = m + 1);
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I don't know any C compiler that accepts it. Are you sure you are not compiling with g++? –  ouah Jul 16 '12 at 11:31
    
@PaulR the result of the assignment operator is not a lvalue in C but is a lvalue in C++, that's why you don't get the error in C++. But even in C++ it still has not the desired precedence. –  ouah Jul 16 '12 at 11:36
    
Aha - that explains it - I guess ideone.com is compiling this as C++. –  Paul R Jul 16 '12 at 14:03

There is not an error in it.Both program gives an output of 8 which is correct.

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Into the statement

condition ? a:b

a and b are expressions that must return the same type after evaluation. This is the only requirement imposed by the C standard. If you have trouble in compiling/running that code, that means that you found a gcc bug, and you must report it to developers.

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