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I know this is not a coding specific problem but this is the most suitable place for asking such questions.So please bear with me.

Suppose I have a dictionary like given below,listing ten liked items of each person

likes={
    "rajat":{"music","x-men","programming","hindi","english","himesh","lil wayne","rap","travelling","coding"},
    "steve":{"travelling","pop","hanging out","friends","facebook","tv","skating","religion","english","chocolate"},
    "toby":{"programming","pop","rap","gardens","flowers","birthday","tv","summer","youtube","eminem"},
    "ravi":{"skating","opera","sony","apple","iphone","music","winter","mango shake","heart","microsoft"},
    "katy":{"music","pics","guitar","glamour","paris","fun","lip sticks","cute guys","rap","winter"},
    "paul":{"office","women","dress","casuals","action movies","fun","public speaking","microsoft","developer"},
    "sheila":{"heart","beach","summer","laptops","youtube","movies","hindi","english","cute guys","love"},
    "saif":{"women","beach","laptops","movies","himesh","world","earth","rap","fun","eminem"}
    "mark":{"pilgrimage","programming","house","world","books","country music","bob","tom hanks","beauty","tigers"},
    "stuart":{"rap","smart girls","music","wrestling","brock lesnar","country music","public speaking","women","coding","iphone"},
    "grover":{"skating","mountaineering","racing","athletics","sports","adidas","nike","women","apple","pop"},
    "anita":{"heart","sunidhi","hindi","love","love songs","cooking","adidas","beach","travelling","flowers"},
    "kelly":{"travelling","comedy","tv","facebook","youtube","cooking","horror","movies","dublin","animals"},
    "dino":{"women","games","xbox","x-men","assassin's creed","pop","rap","opera","need for speed","jeans"},
    "priya":{"heart","mountaineering","sky diving","sony","apple","pop","perfumes","luxury","eminem","lil wayne"},
    "brenda":{"cute guys","xbox","shower","beach","summer","english","french","country music","office","birds"}
}

How can I determine persons who have similar likes.Or maybe who two persons resemble the most.Also it will be helpful if you can point me to the appropriate example or tutorial for user based or item based filtering.

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This is covered quite comprehensively by Chapter 2 of Programming Collective Intelligence. Example code are in Python, which is another plus. –  Shawn Chin Jul 16 '12 at 10:52
    
I'm aware of this book but it is very old(published 2007) and web has changed significantly.So I don't think that most of the examples of this book will work today. –  Rajat Saxena Jul 16 '12 at 10:55
4  
The basic techniques still stand and should work for the sample data you provided. If you're looking for something much more complicated/scalable then you might want to mention that in your question. It might also be worth mentioning what you've tried or considered. –  Shawn Chin Jul 16 '12 at 10:59
    
@RajatSaxena Recommender systems are math. Math doesn't go out of date. The algorithms in the book will work just as well today as they did five years ago. (Of course, there may be better algorithms now, but you should still start with the basic ones). –  Chris Taylor Jul 16 '12 at 11:09
    
@ShawnChin Shawn Chin has given you the answer. The case studies in the book might not work but the Algorithms are evergreen :). Apply the same distance based Algorithm however if you have Big Data than use Distributed Computing stuff and thats it. It is a pretty simple problem to solve (considering a scale of few 100 GB's) unless you are competing for Netflix price. –  Yavar Jul 16 '12 at 11:14
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

(Disclaimer, I am not adept in this field and only have a passing knowledge of collective filtering. The following is simply a collection of resources that I have found useful)

The basics of this is covered quite comprehensively in Chapter 2 of the "Programming Collective Intelligence" book. Example code are in Python, which is another plus.

You might also find this site useful - A Programmer's Guide to Data Mining, in particular Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 which discusses recommendation systems and item-based filtering.

In short, one can use techniques such as calculating the Pearson Correlation Coefficient, Cosine Similarity, k-nearest neighbours, etc. to determine similarities between users based on items they've like/bought/voted on.

Note that there are various python libraries out there that were written for this purpose, e.g. pysuggest, Crab, python-recsys, and SciPy.stats.stats.pearsonr.

For a large data set where number of users exceed the number of items, you can scale the solution better by inversing your data and calculate the correlation between items instead (i.e. item-based filtering) and use that to infer similar users. Naturally, you wouldn't do this in real time but schedule periodic recalculations as a backend task. Some of the approaches can be parallelised/distributed to drastically shorten the computation time (assuming you have the resources to throw at it).

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SequenceMatcher in difflib is useful for this kind of thing. If you use ratio() it returns a value between 0 and 1 corresponding to the similarity between the two sequences, from the docs:

Return a measure of the sequences’ similarity as a float in the range [0, 1]. Where T is the total number of elements in both sequences, and M is the number of matches, this is 2.0*M / T. Note that this is 1.0 if the sequences are identical, and 0.0 if they have nothing in common.

From your example, comparing only 'rajat' against everyone else, (corrected to a dictionary by switching internal {} for []):

import difflib
for key in likes:
    print 'rajat', key, difflib.SequenceMatcher(None,likes['rajat'],likes[key]).ratio()
#Output:
rajat sheila 0.2
rajat katy 0.2
rajat brenda 0.1
rajat saif 0.2
rajat dino 0.2
rajat toby 0.2
rajat mark 0.1
rajat steve 0.1
rajat priya 0.1
rajat grover 0.0
rajat ravi 0.1
rajat rajat 1.0
rajat stuart 0.2
rajat kelly 0.1
rajat paul 0.0
rajat anita 0.2
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Thanks but I'm looking something like "collaborative filtering".Any help regarding collaborative filtering will be appreciated. –  Rajat Saxena Jul 16 '12 at 10:57
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A solution using python recsys library [ http://ocelma.net/software/python-recsys/build/html/quickstart.html ]

from recsys.algorithm.factorize import SVD
from recsys.datamodel.data import Data

likes={
    "rajat":{"music","x-men","programming","hindi","english","himesh","lil wayne","rap","travelling","coding"},
    "steve":{"travelling","pop","hanging out","friends","facebook","tv","skating","religion","english","chocolate"},
    "toby":{"programming","pop","rap","gardens","flowers","birthday","tv","summer","youtube","eminem"},
    "ravi":{"skating","opera","sony","apple","iphone","music","winter","mango shake","heart","microsoft"},
    "katy":{"music","pics","guitar","glamour","paris","fun","lip sticks","cute guys","rap","winter"},
    "paul":{"office","women","dress","casuals","action movies","fun","public speaking","microsoft","developer"},
    "sheila":{"heart","beach","summer","laptops","youtube","movies","hindi","english","cute guys","love"},
    "saif":{"women","beach","laptops","movies","himesh","world","earth","rap","fun","eminem"},
    "mark":{"pilgrimage","programming","house","world","books","country music","bob","tom hanks","beauty","tigers"},
    "stuart":{"rap","smart girls","music","wrestling","brock lesnar","country music","public speaking","women","coding","iphone"},
    "grover":{"skating","mountaineering","racing","athletics","sports","adidas","nike","women","apple","pop"},
    "anita":{"heart","sunidhi","hindi","love","love songs","cooking","adidas","beach","travelling","flowers"},
    "kelly":{"travelling","comedy","tv","facebook","youtube","cooking","horror","movies","dublin","animals"},
    "dino":{"women","games","xbox","x-men","assassin's creed","pop","rap","opera","need for speed","jeans"},
    "priya":{"heart","mountaineering","sky diving","sony","apple","pop","perfumes","luxury","eminem","lil wayne"},
    "brenda":{"cute guys","xbox","shower","beach","summer","english","french","country music","office","birds"}
}

data = Data()
VALUE = 1.0
for username in likes:
    for user_likes in likes[username]:
        data.add_tuple((VALUE, username, user_likes)) # Tuple format is: <value, row, column>

svd = SVD()
svd.set_data(data)
k = 5 # Usually, in a real dataset, you should set a higher number, e.g. 100
svd.compute(k=k, min_values=3, pre_normalize=None, mean_center=False, post_normalize=True)

svd.similar('sheila')
svd.similar('rajat')

Results:

In [11]: svd.similar('sheila')
Out[11]: 
[('sheila', 0.99999999999999978),
 ('brenda', 0.94929845546505753),
 ('anita', 0.85943494201162518),
 ('kelly', 0.53385495931440263),
 ('saif', 0.39985366653259058),
 ('rajat', 0.30757664244952165),
 ('toby', 0.28541364367155014),
 ('priya', 0.26184289111194581),
 ('steve', 0.25043700194182622),
 ('katy', 0.21812807229358305)]

In [12]: svd.similar('rajat')
Out[12]: 
[('rajat', 1.0000000000000004),
 ('mark', 0.89164019482177692),
 ('katy', 0.65207273451425907),
 ('stuart', 0.61675507205285718),
 ('steve', 0.55730648750670264),
 ('anita', 0.49836982296014803),
 ('brenda', 0.42759524471725929),
 ('kelly', 0.40436047539358799),
 ('toby', 0.35972227835054826),
 ('ravi', 0.31113813325818901)]
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Thank you! I've been looking for something like this for a while –  nickromano Sep 18 '13 at 0:49
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The most basic approach I can think of is to find the intersection between the list of likes of each person, the two persons whose likes match the most will have the highest number of intersections.

Something like list(set(list1).intersection(list2)) can be used. This will return a list with the items that define the intersection.

Keep in mind that this approach will not scale that well to a high number of entries, since it requires each user's likes to be compared to every other, it has a complexity of approximately O(n^2), where n is the number of users.

In some of your comments you mention collaborative filtering, but that usually applies to having the same items ranked by different users, and then finding similarities between the ranks, so you can extrapolate for users who have some items ranked in the same way, but not others (here you use the ranks from the users who have given similar ranks on other items). I don't think it's quite the same problem.

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for k in likes:
    if likes["rajat"] & likes[k]:
        print k, likes["rajat"] & likes[k]
    else:
        print k,  " No Like with rajat" 

Output

sheila set(['hindi', 'english'])
katy set(['music', 'rap'])
brenda set(['english'])
saif set(['himesh', 'rap'])
dino set(['x-men', 'rap'])
toby set(['programming', 'rap'])
mark set(['programming'])
steve set(['travelling', 'english'])
priya set(['lil wayne'])
grover No Likes with rajat
ravi set(['music'])
rajat set(['lil wayne', 'x-men', 'himesh', 'coding', 'programming', 'music', 'hindi',  'rap', 'english', 'travelling'])
stuart set(['music', 'coding', 'rap'])
kelly set(['travelling'])
paul No Likes with rajat
anita set(['travelling', 'hindi'])

This would compare the common like of "rajat" with the other members of the dict. There must be a better method to do this

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