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This is in scala.2.8.1

I have an object Config. In it is a lazy val, database.

Sample A:

import Config.database

 trait Dao {  
   protected val database = database  
}

Sample B:

import Config

trait Dao {
  protected val database = Config.database
}

In config, the relevant code is:

lazy val database = 
   somethingFromAFile match {
      case "a" => databaseA
      case "b" => databaseB
      case "c" => databaseC
   }

lazy val databaseA = makeDB("a")
lazy val databaseB = makeDB("b")
lazy val databaseC = makeDB("c")

var changes = throw new Exception ("Not yet initialised")
private def makeDB(db: String) = {
    db match {
      case "a" => var changes = x => 2*x; ... //database making stuff
      case "a" => var changes = x => 3*x; ...
      case "a" => var changes = x => 4*x; ...
    }
}

The order that database is evaluated in is different in Sample A and Sample B.
I don't think should be correct behaviour. Certainly it's not intuitive. If this isn't a bug, could someone explain why this behaviour has been chosen?

The specific behaviour is that inside the lazy val, a var is set to a certain value. In Sample A, the var is set later than it is in Sample B.

EDIT So I just realised that I'd got val database = database. So changing the imports led to a shadowing of variables, although I'd expect that a self referencing val should emit a compiler warning, or overflow the stack?

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1  
Would you mind explaining what the difference is? –  Debilski Jul 16 '12 at 10:43
    
The difference is that one imports the Config object, and database is reference as Config.database, and the other imports the Config.database object, which is used as is. –  MrBones Jul 16 '12 at 10:45
    
@MrBones Importing is essentially just an alias function to make the remaining source easier to write. It's not an operation that makes it into the bytecode. I have Debilski's puzzlement too, as both snippets you've posted ought to be identical to my knowledge. When specifically does database get evaluated in both examples, and what other thing is it appearing out of order in respect to? –  Andrzej Doyle Jul 16 '12 at 10:49
    
I've added a bit more information about the specific behaviour. –  MrBones Jul 16 '12 at 10:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I compiled both of your examples, and then analysed the bytecode with javap -c. (In my example Config.database is a lazy field with a value of ""; the type of database should have no impact).

The first example creates the following bytecode:

Compiled from "foo.scala"
public class foo extends java.lang.Object implements scala.ScalaObject{
public java.lang.String db();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   getfield        #11; //Field db:Ljava/lang/String;
   4:   areturn

public foo();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #17; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   aload_0
   5:   getstatic       #23; //Field Config$.MODULE$:LConfig$;
   8:   invokevirtual   #26; //Method Config$.database:()Ljava/lang/String;
   11:  putfield        #11; //Field db:Ljava/lang/String;
   14:  return

}

The second example creates the following, identical bytecode:

Compiled from "foo.scala"
public class foo extends java.lang.Object implements scala.ScalaObject{
public java.lang.String db();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   getfield        #11; //Field db:Ljava/lang/String;
   4:   areturn

public foo();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #17; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   aload_0
   5:   getstatic       #23; //Field Config$.MODULE$:LConfig$;
   8:   invokevirtual   #26; //Method Config$.database:()Ljava/lang/String;
   11:  putfield        #11; //Field db:Ljava/lang/String;
   14:  return

}

I can't even see superficial differences between the two.


This is consistent with what imports actually are - they're just a method to prevent you having to fully qualify references everywhere. import Config._ doesn't do anything; it just brings the values from Config into the top-level scope, so that during compilation the parser will consider them valid without a prefix.

In order words,

import A.b
...
b

is exactly the same as

...
A.b

Imports only save you typing, they don't change the meaning of the code. If you are seeing differences, then I believe this could only be possible if one of your imports are hiding another definition, so that an unprefixed declaration is interpreted differently depending on how the import is phrased.

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Well I've reduced the code somewhat; I thought I'd captured the essence of the problem above, but it looks like I'll need to flesh it out a bit more. –  MrBones Jul 16 '12 at 10:59
    
And that last part of your answer gave me the clue, though I'd have expected (as I said in my question) I'd have expected the compiler to tell me something. –  MrBones Jul 16 '12 at 11:12
    
I think you do get warnings if references "at the same level" are ambiguous, e.g. if you import A._ and B._, both of which have a symbol foo in them. But I doubt it's feasible to ensure that no two symbols out of everything that's in scope are the same, so in some cases the compiler picks the "obvious" priority. I'm glad this helped you find the issue! –  Andrzej Doyle Jul 16 '12 at 11:18
    
Yeah, but a val which returns only itself must be an obvious candidate to emit a warning. –  MrBones Jul 16 '12 at 11:29

A def might lead to a stack overflow, but not a val. A val is composed of a getter and a setter, so the assignment is done through the setter, and the reading is done through the getter, and no cycle exists. The stored value will be the same it was initialized by the JVM with: null.

There's no warning on self referencing variables because there are valid use cases for that. See, for example, the common "primes" or "fibonacci" streams examples people are so fond of.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate that self referencing is useful at various times; I think there should be a warning for the explicit case of val x = x –  MrBones Jul 16 '12 at 13:46
    
Hey, Daniel! I know you know this, but for the record: val are immutable and include only an accessor method but no mutator method. –  Randall Schulz Oct 31 '12 at 2:32

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