Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I display a line chart with D3 with roughly the following code (given the scale functions x, y and the float array data):

 var line = d3.svg.line()
         .interpolate("basis")
         .x(function (d, i) { return x(i); })
         .y(function (d) { return y(d); });
 d3.select('.line').attr('d', line(data));

Now I want to know the vertical height of the line at a given horizontal pixel position. The data array has lesser data points than pixels and the displayed line is interpolated, so it is not straight-forward to deduce the height of the line at a given pixel just from the data array.

Any hints?

share|improve this question
    
Looks like a tricky problem because d3 is calculates the intermediate values for you. You might have better luck using a combination of d3.svg.area and d3.geom.polygon... –  Wex Jul 16 '12 at 20:42
    
Would you be able to select the line (by id for example) from svg container and get its x1,x2,y1 and y2 attributes? (I'm sorry if i misunderstood your question) –  alm Aug 14 '12 at 12:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Edited 19-Sep-2012 per comments with many thanks to nrabinowitz!

You will need to do some sort of search of the data returned by getPointAtLength. (See https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/SVGPathElement.)

// Line
var line = d3.svg.line()
     .interpolate("basis")
     .x(function (d) { return i; })
     .y(function(d, i) { return 100*Math.sin(i) + 100; });

// Append the path to the DOM
d3.select("svg#chart") //or whatever your SVG container is
     .append("svg:path")
     .attr("d", line([0,10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100]))
     .attr("id", "myline");

// Get the coordinates
function findYatX(x, line) {
     function getXY(len) {
          var point = line.getPointAtLength(len);
          return [point.x, point.y];
     }
     var curlen = 0;
     while (getXY(curlen)[0] < x) { curlen += 0.01; }
     return getXY(curlen);
}

console.log(findYatX(5, document.getElementById("myline")));

For me this returns [5.000403881072998, 140.6229248046875].

This search function, findYatX, is far from efficient (runs in O(n) time), but illustrates the point.

share|improve this answer
2  
Unless I'm misunderstanding the docs, this is incorrect - you would not get the point at x=3, you'd get the point at pathLength=3, which could vary widely depending on the shape of the path. –  nrabinowitz Sep 18 '12 at 23:51
    
@nrabinowitz yikes, you're quite right. Not sure how I misread that. Will edit my answer when I find a real solution. Thanks. –  ZachB Sep 19 '12 at 3:18
2  
I'm pretty sure the only solution for an interpolated line is doing a search for .getPointAtLength(i) until Math.abs(i - x) is less than some threshold. A binary search might work reasonably well here. Would post an answer myself but I haven't had time :). –  nrabinowitz Sep 19 '12 at 4:08
    
Yah, that's all I could think of too. See edited post. Many thanks @nrabinowitz. –  ZachB Sep 19 '12 at 20:05

I Updated this answer findYbyX function. Is should be quite efficient O(log(n)).

var findYatXbyBisection = function(x, path, error){
  var length_end = path.getTotalLength()
    , length_start = 0
    , point = path.getPointAtLength((length_end + length_start) / 2) // get the middle point
    , bisection_iterations_max = 50
    , bisection_iterations = 0

  error = error || 0.01

  while (x < point.x - error || x > point.x + error) {
    // get the middle point
    point = path.getPointAtLength((length_end + length_start) / 2)

    if (x < point.x) {
      length_end = (length_start + length_end)/2
    } else {
      length_start = (length_start + length_end)/2
    }

    // Increase iteration
    if(bisection_iterations_max < ++ bisection_iterations)
      break;
  }
  return point.y
}
share|improve this answer

I have tried implementing findYatXbisection (as nicely suggested by bumbu), and I could not get it to work AS IS.

Instead of modifying the length as a function of length_end and length_start, I just decreased the length by 50% (if x < point.x) or increased by 50% (if x> point.x) but always relative to start length of zero. I have also incorporated revXscale/revYscale to convert pixels to x/y values as set by my d3.scale functions.

function findYatX(x,path,error){
    var length = apath.getTotalLength()
        , point = path.getPointAtLength(length)
        , bisection_iterations_max=50
        , bisection_iterations = 0
    error = error || 0.1
    while (x < revXscale(point.x) -error || x> revXscale(point.x + error) {
        point = path.getPointAtlength(length)
        if (x < revXscale(point.x)) {
             length = length/2
        } else {
             length = 3/2*length
        }
        if (bisection_iterations_max < ++ bisection_iterations) {
              break;
        }
    }
return revYscale(point.y)
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think your algorithm will work quite badly in some cases. Also it seems to have much more iterations than bisection method. For example if your length is 100 and your point is at 90 then your algorithm will do: 1) 90 < 100 so length = 100/2 = 50 2) 90 > 50 so length = 50*1.5 = 75 3) 90 > 75 so length = 75*1.5 = 112.5 4) 90 < 112.5 so length = 112.5/2 = 56.5 5) 90 > 56.5 so length = 56.5*1.5 = 84.75 6) 90 > 84.75 so length = 84.75*1.5 = 127.125 7) 90 < 127.125 so length = 127.125/2 = 63.5625 As you see your algorithm is just jumping around sometimes even exceeding initial length. –  bumbu Jun 27 at 12:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.