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I have an MVC application where I am implementing CQRS where I have seperated saving data from reading data into seperate interfaces. I am using constructor injection for injecting the concrete instances of these interfaces into the Controller. For constructor injection I am using Unity container. See below example

//The Employee controller 
public class EmployeeController : Controller
{
    IEmployeeRepository _Writer;

    IEmployeeQuery _Reader;

    //constructor injection
    public EmployeeController(IEmployeeRepository writer, IEmployeeQuery reader)
    {
        this._Writer = writer;
   this._Reader = reader;   

    }


    //To Do: constructor injection for write operations only
    public EmployeeController(IEmployeeRepository writer)
    {
        this._Writer = writer;

    }

    //To Do: constructor injection for read operations only
    public EmployeeController(IEmployeeQuery reader)
    {
        this._Reader = reader;

    }
}


//Registration of the concrete types in the unity container.
public static class Bootstrapper
{
    public static void ConfigureUnityContainer()
    {
        IUnityContainer container = new UnityContainer();

        container.RegisterType<IEmployeeRepository, EmployeeRepository>(new HttpContextLifetimeManager<IEmployeeRepository>());
        container.RegisterType<IEmployeeQuery, EmployeeQueries>(new HttpContextLifetimeManager<IEmployeeQuery>());
        ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(new UnityControllerFactory(container));
    }
}

//The derived Controller Factory for injection dependencies in the Controller constructor
public class UnityControllerFactory : DefaultControllerFactory
{
    IUnityContainer container;

    public UnityControllerFactory(IUnityContainer container)
    {
        this.container = container;
    }
    protected override IController GetControllerInstance(RequestContext requestContext, Type controllerType)
    {


        try
        {
            if (controllerType == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("controllerType");
            }

            if (!typeof(IController).IsAssignableFrom(controllerType))
            {
                throw new ArgumentException(String.Format("Type requested is not a controller: {0}", controllerType.Name), "controllerType");
            }

            return container.Resolve(controllerType) as IController;





        }
        catch (Exception)
        {

            return null;
        }
    }
}

I have figured out that for any action I will either be fetching data or writing data but not both. In that case I need to invoke the controller constructors conditionally depending on which of "_Writer" or "_Reader" I need to initialize.

How can this be done ?

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2 Answers 2

Looks like you have one controller where you should use two? If you never need to be able to both read and write I would consider to refactor that component towards single responsibility.

If you don't want to do that I would consider injecting a NullObject instead of not injecting that dependency at all. See this thread.

The TecX project contains an extension that mimics NInject's contextual binding. That would allow you to specify when to inject what dependency. The code can be found inside the TecX.Unity project (folder ContextualBinding). The tests that show how to use it are inside the TecX.Unity.ContextualBinding.Test project).

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@@Sebastian, I have not seen multiple controllers used for same View in practice in Web applications, though in theory it seems possible. Could you show me an example of how this can be achieved ? I would prefer to go for the conceptually correct option of single responsibility before trying out other options. –  devanalyst Jul 17 '12 at 4:34
    
@devanalyst I am no expert on MVC. These are guidelines that I find useful in any kind of architecture. If you have two separate parts that work independently - don't try to put them in the same class this (usually) violates SRP. Is it really the same view when you only do either read or write? If it is and you can do both (read and write) triggered by the same view - are there really no actions where you might have to do both? Is it worth the effort to inject only a reader or writer? Just some ideas. –  Sebastian Weber Jul 17 '12 at 6:52

What about lazy loading components? You resolve both dependencies but only one that is really used is initialized.

Sample here: http://pwlodek.blogspot.com/2010/05/lazy-and-ienumerable-support-comes-to.html

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