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I want to understand the below line

"The SSL Cert is bound to the actual host name. If you have an SSL cert for "qa.example.com", it won't work on your machine named "dev.example.com".

Questions:

  1. How is possible to create a cert bound to a hostname?

  2. I have a client and server model. The server is not validating the client during communication. So far I had ONE set of key and certs which is installed on multiple servers and the communication works fine.

Now we have new set of certs which is bound to a hostname. Each server has a set of certs. When swapped the communication does not work. "Handshake failure" obtained.

What's happening here? Who validates the hostname?

share|improve this question
    
Please post the entire exception and stack trace. – EJP Jul 17 '12 at 22:19

The client validates the certificate returned by the server. Among the various verifications performed the client checks that the hostname embedded in the certificate matches the hostname of the server. If the hostname doesn't match the handshake fails.

This means that if your certificate was issued for qa.example.com, it won't work on dev.example.com. For the same certificate to work for both hostnames you'll need a wildcard certificate (issued for *.example.com).

share|improve this answer
2  
As an alternative to a wildcard certificate, you could use a single certificate with multiple subject alternative names. – Kkkev Jul 16 '12 at 19:08
    
@user1528768 Please note that hostname checking is a function of HTTPS, not SSL. – EJP Jul 16 '12 at 23:57
    
Thanks for the reply. from your reply I understand that The client validates the certificate returned by the server. How does this validation happen? There are multiple clients hitting my server and after the certs are issued which are bound to hostname . There are no code changes made in the client to validate the hostname. How does this validation happen ? Like the above comment Its not a HTTPS connection . Its a secure socket connection – user1528768 Jul 17 '12 at 8:26
    
@user1528768 It must be hard coded into the client. There is no hostname checking in Java SSL short of HTTPS. Java (JSSE) just verifies that the certificate is valid and is trusted by the truststore. – EJP Jul 17 '12 at 22:18
    
@EJP : It must be hard coded into the client- hows that possible. I am handling the client pice of code and have not made any changes related new certs. – user1528768 Jul 18 '12 at 5:14

The hostname is in the certificates, you need to generate new certificates with different hostnames. The certificate names is validates by the client when it attempts to establish a secure connection.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. from your reply I understand that The client validates the certificate returned by the server. How does this validation happen? There are multiple clients hitting my server and after the certs are issued which are bound to hostname . There are no code changes made in the client to validate the hostname. How does this validation happen ? Like the above comment Its not a HTTPS connection . Its a secure socket connection – user1528768 Jul 18 '12 at 5:14
    
The SSL certificate itself contains the hostname, and the client merely verifies that the hostname inside the ceritificate matches the hostname of the server it's contacting. You may not be doing this manually on your client, but the SSL implementation you're using probably does. – Hugo Jul 18 '12 at 14:47
    
I am using SSLV3. So does that mean SSLV3 validates the hostnames inside the certificates. 1. I want to understand how this validation is happening. Its all too superficial 2 Can you please provide some link/urls where I could understand how to create a certificate for which client validates the hostname. – user1528768 Jul 19 '12 at 9:09

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