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How do I change the value of the [NSString defaultCStringEncoding] return value? What kind of environment variables or system settings do I need to change?

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Why exactly do you want to change this? What's your actual goal here? –  abarnert Jul 16 '12 at 19:57
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I don't believe you can change it, and from the reference:

in general this encoding should be used rarely, if at all.

Use this method instead:

+ (id)stringWithCString:(const char *)cString encoding:(NSStringEncoding)enc
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I don't want to change it at runtime. I want to configure my system to return a different one. –  angerman Jul 16 '12 at 12:39
    
@angerman This is the only clue in the reference about how it's determined: "This method returns a user-dependent encoding who value is derived from user's default language and potentially other factors". –  trojanfoe Jul 16 '12 at 12:42
    
You can set it to some strange value by choosing Chinese or Japanese System language. But I fail to see how to set it to NSUTF8StringEncoding. –  angerman Jul 16 '12 at 13:22
    
While it's not documented, the value is basically "what classic Mac OS would use for this system", which is NSMacOSRomanStringEncoding for most Western European settings. There's no way to change that without a lot of deep hackery. Any such hackery will probably break any obsolete programs that depend on defaultCStringEncoding, and be irrelevant to any modern programs. –  abarnert Jul 16 '12 at 19:57
    
Which is exactly why I want to know who changes the value and brakes programs. –  angerman Jul 17 '12 at 7:12
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Finally found a solution. You can use ~/.CFUserTextEncoding to mess with the systems defaultCStringEncoding if you really want. (Like Adobe did...)

For more see: http://superuser.com/questions/82123/mac-whats-cfusertextencoding-for

interestingly it does change the behavior of [NSString getCString:maxLength:encoding:] though. Similarly you can force the defaultCStringEncoding to be NSMacOSRomanStringEncoding by setting the file above to 0:0.

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