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I know this is valid:

def printValue():
    print 'This is the printValue() method'

def callPrintValue(methodName):
    methodName()
    print 'This is the callPrintValue() method'

but is there a way to pass a method that receives parameters as a parameter of another function?

Doing this is not possible:

def printValue(value):
    print 'This is the printValue() method. The value is %s'%(value)

def callPrintValue(methodName):
    methodName()
    print 'This is the callPrintValue() method'

This is the stack trace i get:

This is the printValue() method. The value is dsdsd
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in callPrintValue
TypeError: 'NoneType' object is not callable
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted
def printValue(value):
    print 'This is the printValue() method. The value is %s'%(value)

def callPrintValue(methodName, *args):
    methodName(*args)
    print 'This is the callPrintValue() method'

Then you can call it like so:

callPrintValue(printValue, "Value to pass to printValue")

This allows you to pass in an arbitrary number of arguments, and all of them are passed to the function that you call in callPrintValue

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Some people find lambda ugly, but it is a useful tool in cases like this. Rather than modifying the signature of callPrintValue(), you can use lambda to quickly define a new function that binds the arguments to printValue(). Whether you really want to do this depends on many factors, and it may be that adding an *args parameter as others have suggested is preferable. Still, this is an option worth considering. The following works with no modifications to your current code:

>>> callPrintValue(lambda: printValue('"Hello, I am a value"'))
This is the printValue() method. The value is "Hello, I am a value"
This is the callPrintValue() method
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1  
I agree that lambda may be what is called for here (+1). In fact, this is how it is often done in GUI programming (with tkinter for example) as there you don't have any way to modify the function doing the callback. –  mgilson Jul 16 '12 at 13:01
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I guess you can do this


def callPrintValue(methodName, *args):
    methodName(*args)
    print 'This is the callPrintValue() method'

make the call


callPrintValue(printValue, "abc")
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You want to use tuple unpacking:

def print_value(*values):
    print values

def call_print_value(func,args=None):
    func(*args)

call_print_value(print_value,args=('this','works')) #prints ('this', 'works')

From an API point of view, I prefer to keep the arguments that are passed on as a separate keyword. (then it's a little more explicit which arguments are being used by print_value and which ones are being used by call_print_value). Also note that in python, it is customary to have function (and method) names as name_with_underscores. CamelCase is generally used for class names.

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As a follow up to the answers provided already, you may want to check out the the following questions on stackoverflow for a better understanding of *args and/or **kwargs and lambda in python.

  1. What does *args and **kwargs mean?
  2. What does ** (double star) and * (star) do for python parameters?
  3. Python Lambda - why?
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