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I don't know which is the best way to store a timestamp in the database. I want to store the entire date with hours minutes and seconds but it only stores the date ( for instance 2012-07-14 ) and i want to store 2012-07-14 HH:MM:SS. I am using the dateTime object. Here is the code:

In the controller:

$user->setCreated(new \DateTime());

In the entity:

/**
 * @var date $created
 *
 * @ORM\Column(name="created", type="date")
 */
private $created;

Is it better to store the date and the the time separately in the database ? or better to store all together like YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS ? I will have then to compare dates and calculate the remaining times, so that is important in order to simplify the operations later. So what do you think ? can somebody help me?

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3  
Tried to use datetime? –  meze Jul 16 '12 at 13:17
    
And if you need to handle different timezones, read the docs –  meze Jul 16 '12 at 13:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The best way to store a timestamp in the database is obviously to use the timestamp column if your database supports that type. And since you can set that column to autoupdate on create, you dont even have to provide a setter for it.

There is a Timestampable behavior extension for Doctrine 2 which does exactly that from the userland side as well:

Timestampable behavior will automate the update of date fields on your Entities or Documents. It works through annotations and can update fields on creation, update or even on specific property value change.

Features:

  • Automatic predifined date field update on creation, update and even on record property changes
  • ORM and ODM support using same listener
  • Specific annotations for properties, and no interface required
  • Can react to specific property or relation changes to specific value
  • Can be nested with other behaviors
  • Annotation, Yaml and Xml mapping support for extensions

With this behavior, all you need to do is change your annotation to

/**
 * @var datetime $created
 *
 * @Gedmo\Timestampable(on="create")
 * @ORM\Column(type="datetime")
 */
private $created;

Then you dont need to call setCreated in your code. The field will be set automatically when the Entity is created for the first time.

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Timestampable is not very helpful if you handle different timezones. –  meze Jul 16 '12 at 14:02
    
Ok, I will try, that option looks great. Thanks! –  nasy Jul 16 '12 at 14:03
1  
@meze there is no mention of different timezones anywhere in the question and I'd argue timezones are irrelevant for "created" fields. –  Gordon Jul 16 '12 at 14:03
    
@Gordon +1 for this awesome post. I tried your method to compare it with the one I was using (see below). I obtain very similar, but still different times.(Your Method: 2012-07-25 00:07:29 ; My Method: 2012-07-25 00:00:29) What is the reason for this? And which time is more accurate? Thanks –  Patt Jul 24 '12 at 14:04
    
@Sydney_o9 i dont know the reason. there is a seven hour difference which makes me assume the timezone does not get set properly in either of the two approaches. –  Gordon Jul 24 '12 at 14:14

In order to store the date of creation without using the Timestampable behaviour of doctrine, you can also use LifeCycle Callbacks, by adding the annotation @ORM\HasLifecycleCallbacks when you declare the class. Here is what would work in your case to store YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS in the database.

/**
 * @ORM\Entity
 * @ORM\HasLifecycleCallbacks
 * @ORM\Table(name="yourTable")
 */
class Nasy
{

    /**
    * @ORM\Column(name="created", type="string", length=255)
    */

    private $created;
    /**
     * @ORM\PrePersist
     */
    public function doStuffOnPrePersist()
    {
        $this->created = date('Y-m-d H:i:s');
    }

Finally, if you have a problem of timezone, you could set the timezone in the session by using an event listener on login. Matt Drolette did an awesome work on his blog here. You will probably always be storing the time in the timezone your server is in anyway. Then you use the timezone set in the session to display the right time to the user. Good luck.

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The problem with your code is you're storing it in a string and that makes it impossible to do sql operations on it and still be efficient. –  thenetimp Oct 31 '12 at 11:28
    
You have a bug in your format: months vs minutes. Correct format would be ...date('Y-m-d H:i:s'); –  qualbeen Oct 29 '13 at 14:02
    
Well done @qualbeen! Corrected! Thanks. –  Patt Oct 29 '13 at 18:51

Building on @Pratt's answer I did this. I have 2 fields in my entities one for created and one for modified.

/**
* @ORM\Column(type="datetime")
 */
protected $created_at;

/**
* @ORM\Column(type="datetime")
 */
protected $modified_at;

And then using annotation I call this on prePersist and preUpdate

/**
 * @ORM\PrePersist
 * @ORM\PreUpdate
 */
public function updatedTimestamps()
{
    $this->setModifiedAt(new \DateTime(date('Y-m-d H:i:s')));

    if($this->getCreatedAt() == null)
    {
        $this->setCreatedAt(new \DateTime(date('Y-m-d H:i:s')));
    }
}

The function could be broken up into 2 functions one for create one for update, but this is working so I see no reason for the extra code when this is working properly.

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You can use @Version like this:

/**
 * @var date $created
 *
 * @ORM\Column(name="created", type="datetime")
 * @ORM\Version
 */
private $created;

This will only work on a datetime type.

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