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I'm trying to create a ThreadManager object that handles threads created during the application.

The whole purpose is to terminate the threads before closing the main Form and not allowing the creation of new ones during that closing time. As you can see I apply the locking around the whole thread creation code and also inside AllowNewThreads.

I'm pretty sure that there will be times that 2 or more new threads will wait on the lock, which is not something VERY bad, but could cause small delays. Could there be another alternative of the locking placement in order to have better results or perhaps another strategy I have not yet considered?

public class ThreadManager
{
    #region Fields
    private List<Thread> _threads;
    private static Logger _logger = LogManager.GetCurrentClassLogger();
    private static object _lock;
    private bool _allowNewThreads;
    #endregion

    #region Properties

    public bool AllowNewThreads
    {
        get
        {
            return _allowNewThreads;
        }
        set
        {
            lock (_lock)
            {
                _allowNewThreads = value;
            }
        }
    }

    public int CountAlive
    {
        get
        {
            int count = (from t in _threads where (t.IsAlive) select t).Count();
            return count;
        }
    }
    #endregion

    #region Constructors
    private ThreadManager()
    {
        _threads = new List<Thread>();
    }

    public static ThreadManager Instance
    {
        get { return Singleton<ThreadManager>.Instance; }
    }
    #endregion

    #region Methods

    // There must always be thread body in order to create a new thread.
    // Thread parameters are the objects that are needed for calculations etc inside the thread and are optional
    // Start info is the thread itself parameters needed for its creation, such as the thread name, the apartment state 
    // and if it's background or not. That information is optional as well.
    public bool TryAddThread(ParameterizedThreadStart threadBody, object threadParams, ThreadStartInfo startInfo)
    {
        bool success = true;
        try
        {
            lock (_lock)
            {
                if (!AllowNewThreads)
                {
                    throw new Exception("Creation of new threads is denied.");
                }

                Thread f = new Thread(threadBody);

                if (startInfo != null)
                {
                    f.Name = startInfo.Name;
                    f.SetApartmentState(startInfo.ApartmentState);
                    f.IsBackground = startInfo.IsBackground;
                }

                if (threadParams != null)
                {
                    f.Start(threadParams);
                }
                else
                {
                    f.Start();
                }

                _threads.Add(f);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            _logger.ErrorException("AddThread", ex);
            success = false;
        }
        return success;
    }
    #endregion
}
share|improve this question
1  
'I'm trying to create a ThreadManager object that handles threads created during the application'. Can you find some other way of doing whatever it is you want? Queues/threadPools/anything that does not involve direct thread micro-management - a recipie for pain, trouble, difficult debugging and hassle that should be avoided unless your boss/customer is holding a gun to your head, (even then, I think I would rather be shot :). Do you absolutely need to terminate those threads, (eg. because they hold DB connections/transactions that must be closed/committed)? – Martin James Jul 16 '12 at 13:32
    
As a matter of fact, yes. The threads are holding DB connections and transactions and they have to be terminated. Also some other threads are holding open connections with websites. The main problem of the application at the moment is the thread termination sequence that causes occasionally Access Violation exceptions, unhandled by .NET 3.5 Framework. And no, cannot use 4.0 unfortunately. – Souvlaki Jul 16 '12 at 13:37
    
You should have a static lock. And I am just interested how will you terminate threads, surely not by calling Abort()? – oleksii Jul 16 '12 at 14:09
1  
The threads are terminated themselves. Abort() is prohibited! – Souvlaki Jul 16 '12 at 14:14
    
@oleksii Why would he want a static lock on non-static class (even if it is a singleton)? – Chris Sinclair Jul 16 '12 at 14:26

As you mentioned in comments, you are going just to wait until threads are done with the job. Therefore instead of manual managing of threads you can use ThreadPool, because it is much more efficient for short-lived jobs. For long running tasks I would use a Task class (which supports cancellations!) that is available for .NET 3.5 (I think Rx supports it, maybe there is even simpler way).

Threads are really heavy objects and their management can become a tricky part of your app.


Also a comment on the locking object (before the edit), you should try to make sure there is only one object per class in the whole application on which threads can lock, otherwise you will get nasty bugs.

share|improve this answer
    
Task is supported in .NET 4 and 4.5. ThreadPool in my opinion is not suited for my application. Each thread manipulates different data. I don't have let's say a matrix to make calculations. I just parse some data from a website and store that data to a database. There's also a keep alive thread. Most of them live during the whole app lifetime, but when closing it I have to wait for the timeouts to expire and also commit any transactions. – Souvlaki Jul 16 '12 at 15:17
    
Here is a discussion of Task<T> and options for .NET 3.5 – oleksii Jul 16 '12 at 15:26

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