Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing a long document and I am frequently formatting some terms to italics. After some time I realized that maybe that is now what I want so I would like to remove all the latex commands that format text to italics.

Example:

\textit{Vim} is undoubtedly one of the best editors ever made. \textit{LaTeX} is an extremely powerful, intelligent typesetter. \textbd{Vim-LaTeX} aims at bringing together the best of both these worlds

How can I run a substitution command that recognizes all the instances of \textit{whatever} and changes them to just whatever without affecting different commands such as \textbd{Vim-LaTeX} in this example?

EDIT: As technically the answer that helps is the one from Igor I will mark that one as the correct one. Nevertheless, Konrad's answer should be taken into account as it shows the proper Latex strategy to follow.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use this substitution command:

% s/\\textit{\([^}]*\)}/\1/

If textit can span muptiple lines:

%! perl -e 'local $/; $_=<>; s/\\textit{([^}]*)}/$1/g; print;'

And you can do this without perl also:

%s/\\textit{\(\_.\{-}\)}/\1/g

Here:

  • \_. -- any symbol including a newline character
  • \{-} -- make * non-greedy.
share|improve this answer
    
That will not work; textit-commands can span multiple lines. –  gerrit Jul 16 '12 at 13:38
    
That works as I need, but as @gerrit said I doesn't work for multiple lines. Using the s flag didn't fix it. –  pedrosaurio Jul 16 '12 at 13:47
1  
@pedrosaurio: use the variant with perl; it works –  Igor Chubin Jul 16 '12 at 13:47
    
@gerrit: thank you for the suggestion; I've added another (multiline capable) solution –  Igor Chubin Jul 16 '12 at 13:49
2  
@gerrit: now you can; and I added another cool solution :) –  Igor Chubin Jul 16 '12 at 14:08

You shouldn’t use formatting commands at all in your text.

LaTeX is built around the idea of semantic markup. So instead of saying “this text should be italic” you should mark up the text using its function. For instance:

\product{Vim} is undoubtedly one of the best editors ever made. \product{LaTeX}
is an extremely powerful, intelligent typesetter. \product{Vim-LaTeX} aims at
bringing together the best of both these worlds

… and then, in your preamble, a package, or a document class, you (re-)define a macro \product to set the formatting you want. That way, you can adapt the macro whenever you deem necessary without having to change the code.

Or, if you want to remove the formatting completely, just make the macro display its bare argument:

\newcommand*\product[1]{#1}
share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks for your answer. I understand your point, nevertheless I would still be in the same problem: \product{whatever} to just whatever –  pedrosaurio Jul 16 '12 at 13:48
    
You can redefine \product{whatever} to be a command that does nothing at all. Then, in the final PDF, it would be just the same as if you had written whatever. If you need help, come over to tex.SE. –  gerrit Jul 16 '12 at 14:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.