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I have a table like the one below, where each cluster (column 1) contains annotations of different elements (column 4) in small regions with a start (column 2) and an end (column 3) coordinate. For each entry, I would like to add a column corresponding to the distance to the nearest other element in that cluster. But I want to exclude cases where a pair of elements in the cluster have identical start/end coordinates or overlapping regions. How can I produce such extra nearest_distance column for such data frame?

cluster-47593-walk-0125 252     306     AR    
cluster-47593-walk-0125 6       23      ZNF148
cluster-47593-walk-0125 357     381     CEBPA 
cluster-47593-walk-0125 263     276     CEBPB 
cluster-47593-walk-0125 246     324     NR3C1 
cluster-47593-walk-0125 139     170     HMGA1 
cluster-47593-walk-0125 139     170     HMGA2 
cluster-47593-walk-0125 207     227     IRF8  
cluster-47593-walk-0125 207     227     IRF1  
cluster-47593-walk-0125 207     245     IRF2  
cluster-47593-walk-0125 207     227     IRF3  
cluster-47593-walk-0125 207     227     IRF4  
cluster-47593-walk-0125 207     227     IRF5  
cluster-47593-walk-0125 207     227     IRF6  
cluster-47593-walk-0125 204     245     IRF7  
cluster-47593-walk-0125 13      36      PATZ1 
cluster-47593-walk-0125 14      143     PAX4  
cluster-47593-walk-0125 4       25      RREB1 
cluster-47593-walk-0125 73      87      SMAD1 
cluster-47593-walk-0125 73      87      SMAD2 
cluster-47593-walk-0125 73      87      SMAD3 
cluster-47593-walk-0125 71      89      SMAD4 
cluster-47593-walk-0125 11      40      SP1   
cluster-47593-walk-0125 11      38      SP2   
cluster-47593-walk-0125 7       38      SP3   
cluster-47593-walk-0125 11      38      SP4   
cluster-47593-walk-0125 13      33      GTF2I 
cluster-47593-walk-0125 281     352     YY1   
cluster-47586-walk-0222 252     306     AR    
cluster-47586-walk-0222 6       23      ZNF148
[...]
share|improve this question
    
If you can guarantee that column2 <= column3 always, then at least you can reduce the problem to examining entries that meet the criteria max(data[,3]) < data[i,2]) and min(data[,2] > data[i,3])) . Then maybe look for the which(min(data[i,2]- selected_data[,3]) and so on. –  Carl Witthoft Jul 16 '12 at 15:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, some column names

names(data) <- c("cluster", "start", "end", "element")
data
                   cluster start end element
1  cluster-47593-walk-0125   252 306      AR
2  cluster-47593-walk-0125     6  23  ZNF148
3  cluster-47593-walk-0125   357 381   CEBPA
4  cluster-47593-walk-0125   263 276   CEBPB

Now creating new column

data$nearest_distance <- apply(data, 1, function(x) 
 {
     cluster <- x[1]
     start <- as.numeric(x[2])
     end <- as.numeric(x[3])
     elem <- x[4]
     posb <- data[data$cluster == cluster & data$element != elem & 
                  ((data$start > end) | (data$end < start)), ]
     startDist <- as.matrix(dist(c(end, posb$start)))[, 1]
     endDist <- as.matrix(dist(c(start, posb$end)))[, 1]
     best.dist <- min(startDist[startDist > 0], endDist[endDist > 0])
     return(best.dist)
  }
)

I don't really like at least the beginning of the function, but I couldn't come up with a better solutions.. So we have

                   cluster start end element nearest_distance
1  cluster-47593-walk-0125   252 306      AR                7
2  cluster-47593-walk-0125     6  23  ZNF148               48
3  cluster-47593-walk-0125   357 381   CEBPA                5
4  cluster-47593-walk-0125   263 276   CEBPB                5
5  cluster-47593-walk-0125   246 324   NR3C1                1 
.....

Edit: after fixing system.time() test it appeared that this is a very inefficient way. Obviously, it is redundant to compute whole dist() matrix , so we can change these two lines to

startDist <- abs(end-posb$start)
endDist <- abs(start-posb$end)

Another minor change is that we can delete constraint data$element != elem because later there is > 0. Testing this function on 1 000 clusters with 30 rows each took more than three minutes.. There remains subsetting problem, so I tried to split data into a list and this allows us to use matrices instead of data frames (since constraint for cluster disappears) , which improves efficiency too. This time we have 10 000 clusters with 30 rows each

data <- data[rep(1:30, each = 10000), ]
data$cluster <- factor(rep(1:10000, 30))

spl <- split(data[, c(2:3)], data$cluster)
spl <- lapply(spl, data.matrix)

system.time({
x = lapply(spl, function(z) {
     apply(z, 1, function(x) {
       start <- x[1]
       end <- x[2]
       posb <- z[z[,1] > end | z[,2] < start, , drop = FALSE]
       startDist <- abs(end-posb[, 1])
       endDist <- abs(start-posb[, 2])
       best.dist <- min(startDist[startDist > 0], endDist[endDist > 0])
       return(best.dist)
     })
  })
})
data$nearest_distance = unsplit(x, data$cluster)


user  system elapsed 
18.16    0.00   18.35 
share|improve this answer
    
looks pretty nice +1 –  lockedoff Jul 16 '12 at 16:09
    
I have datasets ranging from 10e5 to 10e7 entries, and it takes quite a while for me, but nothing impossible. Faster would be better :-p –  719016 Jul 16 '12 at 22:15
    
@130490868091234, you are right, just found a mistake in efficiency test and now I think it could be improved.. –  Julius Jul 16 '12 at 22:29

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