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I have a text file. In case there are more than one consecutive line that starts with @, I want to delete all these lines, except of the last occurrence of of a line with @.

For example, lets say I have input file:

abc

@abc

@def

333

@asd

@poi

@789

The output should be:

abc

@def

333

@789

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1  
What have you tried? –  chepner Jul 16 '12 at 14:46
1  
I dont think you can do that with sed, as it works on each line of input separately –  poncha Jul 16 '12 at 14:50
1  
@poncha use it with tr -- see my answer below. I just found out about tr, but it's been surprisingly useful. –  Kasapo Jul 16 '12 at 14:56
    
@Kasapo thanks for the tip... but then you need to replace it with some char that does not for sure appear in the text... no? –  poncha Jul 16 '12 at 15:00
1  
I think awk would be the answer here... –  Drake Clarris Jul 17 '12 at 13:31
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I saw awk tag. so I add an awk one-liner, which could sovle your problem: (see test below)

kent$  cat a.txt
abc
@abc
@def
333
@asd
@poi
@789

kent$  awk 'BEGIN{FS=""}
        {if(c==$1){l=$0;next;} if(c) print l;c=$1;l=$0;} 
        END{print }' a.txt 
abc
@def
333
@789
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You can use tr with sed:

cat input_file | tr '\n' ' ' | sed s/<pattern>//

tr replaces newlines with spaces, making the regex easier.

This pattern seems to work:

cat file.txt | tr '\n' ' ' | sed -e "s/\(@\w*\s\)*\(@\w*\s\)/\2/g"
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You may need to tweak that a little, but it worked fine with the input you gave. I'll leave the testing and potential debugging to you :) –  Kasapo Jul 16 '12 at 14:58
1  
+1 ;) but in case original can contain spaces, you will need to come up with some other character unique enough to be separator (and regex will also change then) –  poncha Jul 16 '12 at 15:01
    
indeed, you could use tr '\n' '#' or something iff you know of some char that won't be in your text file. Or, if you know there are no spaces in the source, just change the spaces back to newlines. +1 for poncha anyhow –  Kasapo Jul 16 '12 at 15:04
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http://ideone.com/Ng7p2

/^@/ { last_line=$0; line_to_print=true }
/^[^@]/ { if ( line_to_print == true ) print last_line; print $0; line_to_print=false }
END { if ( line_to_print == true ) print last_line }
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A multi-line sed solution:

sed -n '
  $p         # Always print last line
  N          # Append next line to pattern space
  /@.*\n@/D  # Delete first line of pattern space if both
             # lines start with an @, and start over
  P          # Otherwise print first line of pattern space,
  D          # delete it and start over
  ' infile
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one thing -- if there are two blank lines between the @-words I think this will fail. Adding an asterisk to the "\n" should do the trick though, right? Interesting options passed to sed though! –  Kasapo Jul 16 '12 at 19:56
    
Or \+ rather. Yes it's a nice challenge to solve these sort of problems in sed. The info page is quite informative. –  Thor Jul 16 '12 at 23:01
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