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I have a small Python script that I need to modify because the format of the metrics file has changed slightly. I do not know Python at all and have tried to take an honest effort to fix it myself. The changes make sense to me but apparently there is still one issue with the script. Otherwise, everything else is working. Here's what the script looks like:

import sys
import datetime

##########################################################################

now = datetime.datetime.now();
logFile = now.strftime("%Y%m%d")+'.QE-Metric.log';

underlyingParse = True;
strParse = "UNDERLYING_TICK";
if (len(sys.argv) == 2):
    if sys.argv[1] == '2':
    strParse = "ORDER_SHOOT";
        underlyingParse = False;
elif (len(sys.argv) == 3):
    logFile = sys.argv[2];    
    if sys.argv[1] == '2':
    strParse = "ORDER_SHOOT";
        underlyingParse = False;
else:
    print 'Incorrect number of arguments. Usage: <exec> <mode (1) Underlying (2) OrderShoot> <FileName (optional)>'
    sys.exit()

##########################################################################

# Read the deployment file
FIput = open(logFile, 'r');
FOput = open('ParsedMetrics.txt', 'w');

##########################################################################

def ParseMetrics( file_lines ):

    ii = 0
    tokens = []; 
    for ii in range(len(file_lines)):

        line = file_lines[ii].strip()

        if (line.find(strParse) != -1):

             tokens = line.split(",");
             currentTime = float(tokens[2])

             if (underlyingParse == True and ii != 0):
                 newIndex = ii-1
                 prevLine = file_lines[newIndex].strip()
                 while (prevLine.find("ORDER_SHOOT") != -1 and newIndex > -1):
                     newIndex -= 1;
                     tokens = prevLine.split(",");
                     currentTime -= float(tokens[2]);
                     prevLine = file_lines[newIndex].strip();

         if currentTime > 0:
                 FOput.write(str(currentTime) + '\n')

##########################################################################

file_lines = FIput.readlines()
ParseMetrics( file_lines );

print 'Metrics parsed and written to ParsedMetrics.txt'

Everything is working fine except for the logic that is supposed to reverse iterate through previous lines to add up the ORDER_SHOOT numbers since the last UNDERLYING_TICK event occurred (starting at the code: if (underlyingParse == True and ii != 0):...) and then subtract that total from the current UNDERLYING_TICK event line being processed. This is what a typical line in the file being parsed looks like:

08:40:02.039387(+26): UNDERLYING_TICK, 1377, 1499.89

Basically, I'm only interested in the last data element (1499.89) which is the time in micros. I know it has to be something stupid. I just need another pair of eyes. Thanks!

share|improve this question
4  
The original code seems to have also been written by someone unfamiliar with python.... Check your indentation: it doesn't seem to make sense. –  Francis Avila Jul 16 '12 at 14:58
    
looks like you're missing an indentation in strParse = "ORDER_SHOOT"; I stopped reading after that point... sorry –  zenpoy Jul 16 '12 at 15:02
2  
you don't need ; at the end of lines in python –  zenpoy Jul 16 '12 at 15:04
1  
This looks like it was written by someone familiar with PHP and not Python. –  Burhan Khalid Jul 16 '12 at 15:05
1  
NM, fixed your indentation. Be very careful with mixing tabs and spaces in Python. Either use tabs everywhere, or use spaces everywhere. (The PEP 8 style is 4 spaces per indent level. –  Francis Avila Jul 16 '12 at 15:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So, if command line option is 2, the function creates an output file where all the lines contain just the 'time' portion of the lines from the input file that had the "order_shoot" token in them?

And if the command line option is 1, the function creates an output file with a line for each line in input file that contained the 'underlying_tick' token, except that the number you want here is the underlying_tick time value minus all the order_shoot time values that occurred SINCE the preceding underlying_tick value (or from the start of file if this is the first one)?

If this is correct, and all lines are unique (there are no duplicates), then I would suggest the following re-written script:

#### Imports unchanged.

import sys 
import datetime 

#### Changing the error checking to be a little simpler.
#### If the number of args is wrong, or the "mode" arg is
#### not a valid option, it will print the error message
#### and exit.

if len(sys.argv) not in (2,3) or sys.argv[2] not in (1,2):
    print 'Incorrect arguments. Usage: <exec> <mode (1) Underlying (2) OrderShoot> <FileName (optional)>'
    sys.exit()  

#### the default previously specified in the original code.

now = datetime.datetime.now()

#### Using ternary logic to set the input file to either
#### the files specified in argv[2] (if it exists), or to
#### the default previously specified in the original code.

FIput = open((sys.argv[2] if len(sys.argv)==3 
                          else now.strftime("%Y%m%d")+'.QE-Metric.log'), 'r');

#### Output file not changed.

FOput = open('ParsedMetrics.txt', 'w');

#### START RE-WRITTEN FUNCTION

def ParseMetrics(file_lines,mode): 

#### The function now takes two params - the lines from the 
#### input file, and the 'mode' - whichever the user selected
#### at run-time. As you can see from the call down below, this
#### is taken straight from argv[1]. 

    if mode == '1':

#### So if we're doing underlying_tick mode, we want to find each tick,
#### then for each tick, sum the preceding order_shoots since the last
#### tick (or start of file for the first tick).

        ticks = [file_lines.index(line) for line in file_lines \
                                        if 'UNDERLYING_TICK' in line]

#### The above list comprehension iterates over file_lines, and creates
#### a list of the indexes to file_lines elements that contain ticks.
#### 
#### Then the following loop iterates over ticks, and for each tick,
#### subtracts the sum of all times for order_shoots that occure prior
#### to the tick, from the time value of the tick itself. Then that
#### value is written to the outfile.

        for tick in ticks:
            sub_time = float(file_lines[tick].split(",")[2]) - \
                       sum([float(line.split(",")[2]) \ 
                       for line in file_lines if "ORDER_SHOOT" in line \
                       and file_lines.index(line) <= tick]
            FOput.write(float(line.split(",")[2]))    

#### if the mode is 2, then it just runs through file_lines and
#### outputs all of the order_shoot time values.

    if mode == '2':
        for line in file_lines:
            if 'ORDER_SHOOT' in line:
                FOput.write(float(line.split(",")[2]))

#### END OF REWRITTEN FUNCTION

#### As you can see immediately below, we pass sys.argv[2] for the
#### mode argument of the ParseMetrics function.

ParseMetrics(FIput.readlines(),sys.argv[2])

print 'Metrics parsed and written to ParsedMetrics.txt' 

And that should do the trick. The main issue is that if you have any lines with "UNDERLYING_TICK" that are exact duplicates of any other such line, then this will not work. Different logic would need to be applied to get the correct indexes.

I am sure there is a way to make this much better, but this was my first thought.

It's also worth noting I added a lot of inline line breaks to the above source for readability, but you might want to pull them if you use this as written.

share|improve this answer

It's unclear what is wrong with your output because you don't show your output and we can't really understand your input.

I am assuming the following:

  1. Lines are formatted as "absolutetime: TYPE, positiveinteger, float_time_duration_in_ms", where this last item is the amount of time the thing took.
  2. Lines are sorted by "absolutetime". As a consequence, the ORDER_SHOOTs that belong to an UNDERLYING_TICK are always on the lines since the last UNDERLYING_TICK (or the beginning of the file), and only those lines. If this assumption is not true, then you need to sort the file first. You can either do that with a separate program (e.g. pipe output from sort), or use the bisect module to store your lines sorted and easily extract the relevant lines.

If both these assumptions are true, take a look at the following script instead. (Untested because I don't have a big input sample or an output sample to compare against.)

This is a much more Pythonic style, much easier to read and understand, doesn't make use of global variables as function parameters, and should be much more efficient because it doesn't iterate backwards through lines or load the entire file into memory to parse it.

It also demonstrates use of the argparse module for your command line parsing. This isn't necessary, but if you have a lot of command-line Python scripts you should get familiar with it.

import sys

VALIDTYPES = ['UNDERLYING_TICK','ORDER_SHOOT']

def parseLine(line):
    # format of `tokens`:
    # 0 = absolute timestamp
    # 1 = event type
    # 2 = ???
    # 3 = timedelta (microseconds)
    tokens = [t.strip(':, \t') for t in line.strip().split()]
    if tokens[1] not in VALIDTYPES:
        return None
    tokens[2] = int(tokens[2])
    tokens[3] = float(tokens[3])
    return tuple(tokens)

def parseMetrics(lines, parsetype):
    """Yield timedelta for each line of specified type

    If parsetype is 'UNDERLYING_TICK', subtract previous ORDER_SHOOT 
    timedeltas from the current UNDERLYING_TICK delta before yielding
    """
    order_shoots_between_ticks = []
    for line in lines:
        tokens = parseLine(line)
        if tokens is None:
            continue # go home early
        if parsetype=='UNDERLYING_TICK':
            if tokens[1]=='ORDER_SHOOT':
                order_shoots_between_ticks.append(tokens)
            elif tokens[1]=='UNDERLYING_TICK':
                adjustedtick = tokens[3] - sum(t[3] for t in order_shoots_between_ticks)
                order_shoots_between_ticks = []
                yield adjustedtick
        elif parsetype==tokens[1]:
            yield tokens[3]

def parseFile(instream, outstream, parsetype):
    printablelines = ("{0:f}\n".format(time) for time in parseMetrics(instream, parsetype))
    outstream.writelines(printablelines)

def main(argv):
    import argparse, datetime
    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='Output timedeltas from a QE-Metric log file')
    parser.add_argument('mode', type=int, choices=range(1, len(VALIDTYPES)+1),
        help="the types to parse. Valid values are: 1 (Underlying), 2 (OrderShoot)")
    parser.add_argument('infile', required=False,
        default='{}.QE-Metric.log'.format(datetime.datetime.now().strftime('%Y%m%d'))
        help="the input file. Defaults to today's file: YYYYMMDD.QE-Metric.log. Use - for stdin.")
    parser.add_argument('outfile', required=False,
        default='ParsedMetrics.txt',
        help="the output file. Defaults to ParsedMetrics.txt. Use - for stdout.")
    parser.add_argument('--verbose', '-v', action='store_true')
    args = parser.parse_args(argv)

    args.mode = VALIDTYPES[args.mode-1]

    if args.infile=='-':
        instream = sys.stdin
    else:
        instream = open(args.infile, 'rb')

    if args.outfile=='-':
        outstream = sys.stdout
    else:
        outstream = open(args.outfile, 'wb')

    parseFile(instream, outstream, args.mode)

    instream.close()
    outstream.close()

    if args.verbose:
        sys.stderr.write('Metrics parsed and written to {0}\n'.format(args.outfile))



if __name__=='__main__':
    main(sys.argv[1:])
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