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I have created this trigger to update the seq column. I have to keep track of the order of certain items in the table, but only if the liability_category_id = 1,2. So my ordering is tricky because any item with a liability_category_id = 3 I don't need to track.

In my trigger, I'm querying to find the last entered seq number (using max(seq)), then turning around and updating the new entry with the seq + 1.

DELIMITER $$

USE `analysisdb`$$

DROP TRIGGER /*!50032 IF EXISTS */ `trigger_liability_detail_after_insert`$$

CREATE
/*!50017 DEFINER = 'admin'@'%' */
TRIGGER `trigger_liability_detail_after_insert` AFTER INSERT ON `liability_detail` 
    FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
    DECLARE SortOrder INT;
    IF NEW.liability_category_id = 1 OR NEW.liability_category_id = 2 THEN

    SET SortOrder = (SELECT MAX(seq) FROM liability_detail WHERE analysis_id = new.analysis_id AND liability_category_id IN (1, 2));
    UPDATE liability_detail SET seq = (SortOrder + 1) WHERE id = NEW.id;
    END IF;
    END;
$$

DELIMITER ;

However, when entering a new item, I get this error: Can't update table 'liability_detail' in stored function/trigger because it is already used by statement which invoked this stored function/trigger.

Is there a better way to control the ordering of these items? My original thought was to simply set the first seq = 1, then seq = 2, etc. The ordering is reset for each new analysis_id though.

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Updating the column this way can lead to multiple rows with the same seq value because the max value may be read during an insert but not updated before it is read again during another insertion. You should use auto increment to handle this. –  Dave F Jul 16 '12 at 17:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the workaround is to make this a before trigger and update the record being insert itself prior to insert.

So

CREATE
/*!50017 DEFINER = 'admin'@'%' */
TRIGGER `trigger_liability_detail_after_insert` BEFORE INSERT ON `liability_detail` 
    FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
    DECLARE SortOrder INT;
    IF NEW.liability_category_id = 1 OR NEW.liability_category_id = 2 THEN

    SET NEW.seq = 1 + IFNULL((SELECT MAX(seq) FROM liability_detail WHERE analysis_id = new.analysis_id AND liability_category_id IN (1, 2)), 0);
    END IF;
    END;
$$

That was a quick copy/paste, but it should be something along those lines.

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That's going to be tricky to handle.

The easy answer is if this could be changed to a BEFORE INSERT FOR EACH ROW trigger, then you could:

SET NEW.seq = (SortOrder + 1);

to set the value on the row BEFORE it gets inserted into the table. But you can't do that in an AFTER INSERT FOR EACH ROW trigger.

There are some performance and concurrency concerns with using a trigger. (You don't have any guarantee that you won't be generating a "duplicate" value for the seq column when concurrent inserts are running; but that may not be a show stopper issue for you.)

I would prefer the approach of using a simple AUTO_INCREMENT column for the whole table.

The values from that would be "in order" for all the rows, so a query like

... WHERE liability_category_id = 1 ORDER BY seq 

would return rows "in the order" those rows were inserted. There would be "gaps" in the sequence number for a given liability_category_id, but the sequence (order) of the inserts would be preserved.

(NOTE: MyISAM has a nifty feature of an AUTO_INCREMENT column, let's it "increment" separately for different values of a leading column in an index. But that only works in the MyISAM engine, it doesn't work in InnoDB.)

Aside from an AUTO_INCREMENT column, I would also consider a TIMESTAMP DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP column to record the date/time when the row is inserted.

... WHERE liability_category_id = 1 ORDER BY timestamp_default_current ASC

Both of those approaches are simple column definitions, and do not require any procedural code to be written or maintained.

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