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I'm trying to use awk to read a file and only display lines that do no begin with a + or - 4 or more times in a row. gawk would be fine too. Each grouping is separated by a blank line.

Here's a sample from the file, these are the lines I do not want printed:

+Host is up.
+Not shown: 95 closed ports, 3 filtered ports
+PORT     STATE SERVICE   VERSION
+23/tcp   open  telnet
+9100/tcp open  jetdirect

-Host is up.
-Not shown: 99 closed ports
-PORT     STATE SERVICE VERSION
-5900/tcp open  vnc

A sample from the file which I do want printed ( not 4 or more in a row ):

-Not shown: 76 closed ports, 18 filtered ports
+Not shown: 93 closed ports
PORT    STATE SERVICE VERSION
+514/tcp open  shell

I'm learning how to use awk at the moment as I've been reading O'Reilly's awk & sed but I'm a little stumped on this problem. Also, if anyone cares to, I wouldn't mind seeing non-awk ways of solving this problem with a shell script.

Thanks!

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It's unclear what exactly you're looking for here. Can you give a more complete example, such as a full (if short) input file and the expected output from same? –  danfuzz Jul 16 '12 at 19:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If I understood your question, the input file have records as paragraphs, so you will need to separate them with blank lines. I assumed it for next script:

Content of script.awk:

BEGIN {
        ## Separate records by one or more blank lines.
        RS = ""

        ## Each line will be one field. Both for input and output.
        FS = OFS = "\n"
}

## For every paragraph...
{
        ## Flag to check if I will print the paragraph to output.
        ## If 1, print.
        ## If 0, don't print.
        output = 1

        ## Count how many consecutive rows have '+' or '-' as first
        ## character.
        j = 0

        ## Traverse all rows.
        for ( i = 1; i <= NF; i++ ) {
                if ( substr( $i, 1, 1 ) ~ /+|-/ ) {
                        ++j;
                }
                else {
                        j = 0
                }

                if ( j >= 4 ) {
                        output = 0
                        break
                }
        }

        if ( output == 1 ) {
                print $0 "\n"
        }
}

Assuming following test input file as infile:

+Host is up. 
+Not shown: 95 closed ports, 3 filtered ports
+PORT     STATE SERVICE   VERSION

+Host is up. 
+Not shown: 95 closed ports, 3 filtered ports
+PORT     STATE SERVICE   VERSION
+23/tcp   open  telnet
+9100/tcp open  jetdirect

-Host is up. 
-Not shown: 99 closed ports
-PORT     STATE SERVICE VERSION
-5900/tcp open  vnc 

-Not shown: 76 closed ports, 18 filtered ports
+Not shown: 93 closed ports
PORT    STATE SERVICE VERSION
+514/tcp open  shell

Run the script like:

awk -f script.awk infile

With following output (first record because it doesn't reach to four consecutive rows, and second record because it has a different line between them):

+Host is up.
+Not shown: 95 closed ports, 3 filtered ports
+PORT     STATE SERVICE   VERSION

-Not shown: 76 closed ports, 18 filtered ports
+Not shown: 93 closed ports
PORT    STATE SERVICE VERSION
+514/tcp open  shell
share|improve this answer
    
This works nicely. Thank You! Originally, I was trying to do something like /^[+-]/ ~ $1 with the default FS because I was unaware of another way to match pattern. Setting RS to a blank line was something I thought would work but I didn't know how to match the [+-] since I've only done field matching so far. Thanks again. –  jonschipp Jul 16 '12 at 19:55
    
Since you don't provide the print(f) actions how does your script know when to print the record? output is just a normal variable right? I'm confused as to what provides the actual output action. –  jonschipp Jul 16 '12 at 20:03
    
@jonschipp: The instruction print $0 "\n" inside the last condition if ( output == 1 ). The output flag is reset when found a paragraph with at least 4 consecutive lines with your condition. By default is set. $0 has the whole paragraph and an extra \n is to separate pragraphs in output too. Is this what you are asking or did I misunderstood you? –  Birei Jul 16 '12 at 20:08
    
Yes, that's it. I just didn't notice the print $0 in the code section of your post ( I didn't scroll down to see it ) . I switched to a Mac and the scroll bar doesn't show up unless hovered upon in Chrome. My mistake. –  jonschipp Jul 16 '12 at 20:15
awk '{if(NF>3 &&( $0 ~ /\+/ || $0 ~ /-/) ) print $0}' test.txt
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2  
Useless use of cat. Also, it doesn't answer the question, which has to do with the number of lines in a block, not the number of fields in a line. –  chepner Jul 16 '12 at 17:14
    
In awk, you should never write { if( expr ) print $0} in an action statement. Instead, just write expr as the pattern statement. –  William Pursell Jul 16 '12 at 19:14
    
thanks for the tips. –  aphex Jul 17 '12 at 7:21

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