Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Have been playing around with instruments with not much luck in figuring out how to solve this memory leak.

Firstly the code:

-(NSString *) randomizeHint:(NSString *) wordToShuffle{

    NSMutableString * outputstring = [NSMutableString stringWithCapacity:[wordToShuffle length]];
    NSMutableSet * usedNumberSet = [NSMutableSet setWithCapacity:[wordToShuffle length]];

    for (int i=0; i<[wordToShuffle length]; i++) {
        int randomnum = arc4random()%[wordToShuffle length];

        while ([usedNumberSet containsObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:randomnum]]==YES) {
            randomnum = arc4random()%[wordToShuffle length];
        }

        [usedNumberSet addObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:randomnum]];
        [outputstring appendFormat:@"%c",[wordToShuffle characterAtIndex:randomnum]];
    }

    CCLOG(@"outputstring is:%@",outputstring);
    return outputstring;

 }

Instruments is giving me the following:

Leaked Object = NSCFString, Responsible Library = Foundation, Responsible Frame = -[NSPlaceholderMutableString initWithCapacity:]

Any ideas?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
The code seems right. And in this case NSMutableString is autoreleased. Are you sure this leak is coming in above code? – Inder Kumar Rathore Jul 16 '12 at 16:46
    
Try return [outputstring copy]? – ZhangChn Jul 16 '12 at 16:55
    
It seems to me that if you leak an object anywhere, Instruments points back to the location where it was created. Could it be that the caller of this routine is leaking the returned string? – Phillip Mills Jul 16 '12 at 16:57
    
Thanks for comments guys. InderKumarRathore - I thought NSMutableString was autoreleased too, that's why stumped. ZhangChn - I don't want to have to explicitly release it outside of this method, its a local variable, so the copy won't do it for me. Phillips Mills - Yes,unfortunately this is the last element in the stack trace in my code before instruments goes off into standard libraries. – prazzledazzle Jul 17 '12 at 11:34
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't really need to use a mutable string... especially since your return type is NSString. Just use stringByAppendingFormat:

-(NSString *) randomizeHint:(NSString *) wordToShuffle{

    NSString * outputstring = @"";

    NSMutableSet * usedNumberSet = [NSMutableSet setWithCapacity:[wordToShuffle length]];

    for (int i=0; i<[wordToShuffle length]; i++) {
        int randomnum = arc4random()%[wordToShuffle length];

        while ([usedNumberSet containsObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:randomnum]]==YES) {
            randomnum = arc4random()%[wordToShuffle length];
        }

        [usedNumberSet addObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:randomnum]];

        // just set outputstring like so... no need to worry about a leaky mutable string then
        outputstring = [outputstring stringByAppendingFormat:@"%c",
                    [wordToShuffle characterAtIndex:randomnum]];
    }


    return outputstring;

}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for better conduct (i.e., avoiding mutables whenever possible). Also, if your leak is in this section of code, this will probably help. It's really hard to leak NSString objects. – Riley Avron Jul 16 '12 at 16:55
    
i'll give this a try and get back to you. Thanks for help. – prazzledazzle Jul 17 '12 at 11:37
    
that seems to have resolved it. Thanks @jerrylroberts – prazzledazzle Jul 17 '12 at 13:33
    
There have been times where I thought I needed an NSMutableString and each time I end up refactoring it out later. Glad I could help! – jerrylroberts Jul 17 '12 at 13:37

Look at where the returned string is used. Possibly you are retaining it and dealloc'ing the object that retained the string without first releasing the retained string. Instruments will still point to this section of code as being the 'leaked' object. The hardest part is locating the 'leaker'. And yes, you can leak a string, I just wrote the recipe for it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.